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Although the death rate from stroke is declining (mostly), it is rising for other neurologic diseases such as Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease (PD). As opposed to Alzheimers we can pinpoint the abnormality in the brain that leads to PD, which involves a substantial destruction of the dopamine-producing neurons in the substantia nigra. By the time an individual has lost 50%-70% of the dopamine-producing neurons in this region, the symptoms of PD, such as tremor, slowness of movement, rigidity, and impaired balance and coordination, are already apparent.

You might think that simply giving dopamine ( as is currently the primary therapy) would resolve the symptoms, but any of the initial benefits of dopamine soon erode, leaving the patient trapped in a body that is increasingly less responsive. We also know that PD is associated with neuroinflammation and energy system dysfuntion (these two events are interlinked). Therefore, we need a therapy that assists both to offer a greater opportunity of clinical success.[1]

Parkinson disease (PD) is a common age associated neurodegenerative disorder of the central nervous system[1]that was first described in an essay entitled “An essay of the Shaking Palsy” by James Parkinson in 1817. Clinically PD is characterised by resting tremor, bradykinesia, rigidity and postural instability. Causes for the disease are not well known however environmental, genetic, and immunological factors have been associated with the onset of this disease.

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Back in 2008 a team of researchers published a paper in the Archives of Neurology that exposed a striking incidence of Vitamin D deficiency in patients diagnosed with Parkinsons Disease.[1] They compared the Parkinson’s patients with healthy controls and patients with diagnosed Alzheimers disease. In both groups the Parkinson’s patients presented with reduced Vit D status compared to the others.

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Oral Glutathione Equivalent to IV Therapy!

Tuesday, 11 January 2011 by | Comments: 11

Michael Ash BSc DO ND F.DipION and Marty Jones PharmD review the changing face of glutathione and explore the acetylated form as an alternative to IV glutathione therapy.

Reduced glutathione also known as glutathione or GSH is found in all living systems.[1] Lowered tissue GSH levels have been observed in several disease conditions.[2] The restoration of cell GSH levels in a number of these conditions have proven to be beneficial. Thus, strategies to boost cell glutathione level are of marked therapeutic significance.

GSH is the smallest of the intracellular thiols (a compound that contains the functional group composed of a sulphur-hydrogen bond (-SH) hence its unpleasant smell when mercaptans are released)  and its high donating electron capacity combined with dense intracellular concentration provides significant oxidative reducing capacity.[3]

Research: In this study, researchers measured blood levels of total homocysteine ((t)Hcy), vitamin B(12) and folic acid in patients with Parkinson s disease (PD) and in age-matched controls, and searched for possible associations between these levels with smoking, alcohol consumption, L-DOPA treatment and disease duration in PD patients.

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