FORGOT YOUR DETAILS?

Faecal Transplant (FT) and IBD

Tuesday, 25 September 2012 by | Comments: 2

I have explored the role of appropriate transplantation in the resolution of MRSA infection that fails to resolve with antibiotic therapy, and have intimated that other conditions of the bowel and linked tissues may also benefit. The model is: that loss of mucosal tolerance underlies the pathology of inflammatory bowel disease and is also linked to irritable bowel syndrome. These altered states of function reflect a combination of environmental, genetic and emotional events that coalesce into a wide range of conditions.

Giardia lamblia (synonymous with Giardia intestinalis, Lamblia intestinalis and Giardia duodenalis) is a flagellated protozoan parasite that colonises and reproduces in the small intestine, causing giardiasis. The giardia parasite attaches to the epithelium by a ventral adhesive disc, and reproduces via binary fission. Giardiasis does not spread via the bloodstream, nor does it spread to other parts of the gastro-intestinal tract, but remains confined to the lumen of the small intestine.

Tagged under: , , , ,

IBS And Food – Is There A Link?

Wednesday, 02 November 2011 by

There is a growing body of evidence to suggest that certain dietary constituents exacerbate symptoms and perhaps contribute to the pathogenesis of IBS. Patients have long associated their IBS symptoms with the ingestion of certain foods, combinations of foods, or generally with meals. Response rates from elimination diets have ranged from 15%-71%,[1] with wheat, milk, and eggs being the most commonly implicated foods.

Tagged under: , , ,

It will be of no real surprise to know that the incidence of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is common. Around the world it is estimated that some 10-20% of the population suffer from it. This is not an inconsequential number, and apart from the miserable statistics, it comes with loss of function, misery, anxiety, pain, bloating, altered bowel habits and loss of quality of life.

Whilst a clear explanation of the cause remains somewhat elusive, there is an increasing acceptance that the relationship between the brain-gut axis, central nervous system, peripheral stress response, infection, dysbiosis, barrier defects, inflammation and immune imbalance play significant roles in the causation.

Functional gut problems, such as those classified by the Rome criteria as IBS are a significant health problem for many people. The use of probiotics as a single or multiple intervention offers a potential route to resolution, but the data is as yet inconsistent and in need of further clarification. This is the opinion of a group from Thames Valley University in a recently published review.[1]

Tagged under: , ,

Dientamoeba Fragilis is it Really a Problem

Monday, 10 January 2011 by | Comments: 5

Dientamoeba Fragilis

First, some background to this parasite and a brief discussion of what may be used pharmaceutically and then a review of how a non-drug approach may be applied through the understanding of the mechanisms employed by the organism and its relative susceptibility to eradication strategies.

Dientamoeba fragilis (D. fragilis)is a trichomonad (a genus of anaerobic protists that are parasites of vertebrates) parasite found in the gastrointestinal tract of humans and implicated as a cause of gastrointestinal disease. D. fragilis has been found in most parts of the world in both rural and cosmopolitan areas. Infection with D. fragilis is called Dientamoebiasis and is associated variously with symptoms of abdominal pain, diarrhoea, weight loss, and fever.[1]

Dientamoeba fragilis is a parasite that causes gastrointestinal problems. Despite its name, Dientamoeba fragilis is not an amoeba but a flagellate. This protozoan parasite produces trophozoites; cysts have not been identified. Infection may be either symptomatic or asymptomatic.

LGG improves IBS in Children

Monday, 29 November 2010 by

Functional Bowel problems can be a real problem, causing considerable emotional as well as physical distress. If you are a child and not really able to comprehend or manage your life as easily as an adult and you have IBS it can be very lonely.

This study published online on the 15th November will provide relief for parents, clinicians and children.[1] The use of a well studied probiotic LGG. Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG (LGG) reduced the frequency and severity of abdominal pain in children with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), with persistent benefit once the treatment was stopped.

Tagged under: , ,

Probiotics are widely consumed and the widespread advertising is often not really justified by the evidence. Many products were never studied as such and some companies use studies performed with other (and different) products for advertising.

In the March edition of GUT a systematic review on the randomised control trials (RCT) undertaken so far suggests that many are of good quality.[1], they determine that meta-analysis is impossible due to the various strains, phenotypes and genome vary greatly.[2] As a consequence and as stressed by the FAO/WHO joint report the benefits of one probiotic ‘cannot be extrapolated to other probiotic strains without experimentation.[3] However there tend to be properties consistent with different groups, from which strain specific organisms may be extracted.

IBS Not Improved by St Johns Wort

Wednesday, 13 January 2010 by

ajg_cimage

St. John’s wort, an herb commonly used to treat mild-to-moderate depression, may not improve symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) say researchers in the American Journal of Gastroenterology.[1]

Irritable bowel syndrome is characterised by cramping, abdominal pain, bloating, constipation and diarrhoea. This team proposed that St. John’s wort may help improve IBS symptoms because antidepressant drugs are often used to treat the condition and have some level of success.

Confused About Abdominal Bloating? – No More!

Friday, 13 November 2009 by | Comments: 5

adominalMichael Ash BSc(Hons).DO. ND. FDipION reviews the current understanding behind bloating and distension.

The unpleasant symptoms of bloating and abdominal distension are common and bothersome, affecting up to 96% of patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders (such as IBS) and an estimated 30% of the general population. Clear pathophysiologic explanations have been lacking and available treatment options can appear contradictory and ineffective. Treatments will be explored in a follow up review.

TOP