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Choline and Alzheimer’s

Monday, 04 November 2019 by

cholineEarlier this year researchers from Arizona State University set out to investigate the effects of #choline on #Alzheimer’s disease (#AD). Their study focused on mice bred to display AD symptoms who were given high doses of choline in their diets. As a result of the supplementation their offspring showed improvements in spatial memory compared to those who received a normal amount of choline in the womb.  The benefits of the extra supplementation proved to be transgenerational, protecting not just the mice taking the supplement through gestation and lactation but also their future offspring. As a result of this study the same scientists began new research focusing just on female mice to see whether supplementing throughout life would reduce AD pathology and even rescue memory deficits of mice already bred to contain AD transgenes.

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currentCoverSummary review by Antony Haynes BA, RNT, promoted by attendance to a lecture presented by Professor Dale Bredesen MD, Augustus Rose Professor, Director, Easton Center for Alzheimer’s Disease Research, UCLA Founding President, Buck Institute

The problem facing may people in the coming decades is that of loss of cognition, and for those already facing this reality it may be of some comfort to know that a lifestyle approach has generated very positive recovery of function using a simple set of interventions. Published in the journal Aging This report describes a novel, comprehensive, and personalised therapeutic program that is based on the underlying pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease, and which involves multiple modalities designed to achieve metabolic enhancement for neurodegeneration (MEND).[1]

A pilot study shows promise for age-related cognitive diseases

The results of the study appeared online October 10 in Neuroscience Letters.[1]

It’s well known that the brains of mediators change, but it’s not entirely clear what those changes mean or how the changes might benefit the mediator. A new pilot study led by researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Centre suggests that the brain changes associated with meditation and stress reduction may play an important role in slowing the progression of age-related cognitive disorders like Alzheimer’s disease and other dementia’s.

Over the last few years a number of studies exploring the potential benefits of caffeine intake have been appearing in the literature. I am of the opinion that whilst each client or patient must be looked at in terms of their overall food and fluid intake, as well as their health goals, that the knee jerk exclusion of caffeine from someone’s daily intake may need to be rethought.

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Published in the March 6 issue of the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, the early findings show that vitamin D3 may activate key genes and cellular signalling networks to help stimulate the immune system to clear the amyloid-beta protein.[1]

Previous laboratory work by the team demonstrated that specific types of immune cells in patients with Alzheimer’s disease may respond to therapy with vitamin D3 and curcumin, a chemical found in turmeric spice, by stimulating the innate immune system to clear amyloid beta. But the researchers didn’t know how it worked.

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B Vitamins Slow Brain Shrinkage

Tuesday, 14 September 2010 by

The rate of whole brain atrophy was significantly less in the vitamin B complex treated group. The figure above courtesy of Plos One shows the brain of one female participant on placebo (left) and one female participant on vitamin B complex on the right. Blue areas indicate areas of brain atrophy. Rates of atrophy were .76% per year in the vitamin B group and 1.08% in the placebo group--a highly statistically significant reduction (p value<.001).

There is a growing awareness that brain atrophy is a miserable consequence of aging and when combined with loss of mental function it makes for a very unattractive outcome. The paper out in September 2010 from the research team at Oxford showed that moderate doses of the supplement containing B Vitamins: Folic acid (0.8 mg/d), vitamin B12 (0.5 mg/d) and vitamin B6 (20 mg/d) over 2 years could halve the rate of brain shrinkage – a physical symptom associated memory loss and dementia in the elderly.[1]

At the end of the trial the effects of the vitamin treatment were found to be dramatic, and most pronounced in participants who started out with the highest rates of brain shrinkage.

On average, taking B vitamins slowed the rate of brain atrophy by 30%, and in many cases reductions was as high as 53% were seen.

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Vitamin E Prevents Alzheimer’s?

Monday, 12 July 2010 by | Comments: 1

A study in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease has raised the interesting correlation between a single nutrient with multiple components and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) reduction.[1] Whilst this is early days in terms of definitive strategic planning the indications are that mixed tocopherols are able, when present in adequate quantities in the plasma to confer a risk reduction in the region of 50%. This is a compelling ration of benefit to risk for anyone planning to try to mitigate their future brain disease and whilst correlation is not the same as causation the benefits of modest supplementation with suitable Vit E supplements makes for an attractive addition to the recommendations I have described earlier.

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Alzheimers Postponed by Diet!

Wednesday, 14 April 2010 by

If Alzheimer’s is a disease related to adverse inflammatory responses over time, could one of the largest and most regular antigenic burden – our foods have a significant impact on risk of development. What level of conviction would we as humans looking at a future of declining cognitive function require to moderate our food selection.

The journal Archives of Neurology in April 2010 published a paper looking at the role of a protective diet over time on the risk of Alzheimer’s development in northern Manhattan, New York.[1]

As humans we are prone to wide food selection and isolated or synergistic combination become complex. To try and resolve a methodological error risk, this group used an alternative strategy called dietary pattern analysis.[2] Instead of looking at individual nutrients or foods, pattern analysis examines the effects of overall diet.

A group of 2,148 older adults (age 65 and older) without dementia living in New York were selected. They  provided information about their diets and were assessed for the development of dementia every 1.5 years for an average of four years. Several dietary patterns were identified with varying levels of seven nutrients previously shown to be associated with Alzheimer’s disease risk:

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