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Immune-Responses-to-Vaccinations--Gut-Microbiotas-Crucial-Role#Vaccines are a highly effective way to prevent infectious diseases as well as reducing the need for #antibiotics and therefore antibiotic resistance. However, #immune responses to vaccinations vary hugely between different individuals and populations. Researchers from Flinders University, South Australia, and Stamford University, USA, have now concluded that the composition and function of an individual’s #gut #microbiota is a driving force in affecting responses to vaccination. The review published in Nature Reviews Immunology, showed how microbiota-targeted interventions could help infants and other at risks group receive the full benefit of effective vaccines.

Vaccine and Wild Type Immune Preparedness

Thursday, 15 April 2021 by | Comments: 1
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Published 17th February 2021 Ayurvedic proverb: “When diet is wrong, medicine is of no use; when diet is correct, medicine is of no need.” The shift in messaging since the allocated timeline for 15m vaccinations was achieved in the UK, is a fascinating process of dialogue and development. One can imagine that numerous pressures are

Selenium, ’Shrooms, Astragalus, and Andrographis

Monday, 10 December 2018 by | Comments: 4

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How a Trace Mineral, Maitake Mushroom, and Adaptogenic Herbs Offer Comprehensive Immune Protection by Carrie Decker ND. The times when we need additional immune support often hit us by surprise. Whether it is waking up with a sore throat and the sniffles or leaving work early with a fever and the chills, we often don’t

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cti_cimageMay 2016 saw the publication of an open access article, that beautifully captures the zeitgeist of how the food we eat, the microbiome we possess, the genes we express and the metabolomics information we produce coalesce into a risk benefit model.[1]

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08A review article in Gastroenterologica e Dietologica explores the evidence for the use of LGG as a therapeutic probiotic.[1] Probiotics are becoming increasingly important in basic and clinical research, but they are also a subject of considerable economic interest due to their expanding popularity. They are live micro-organisms which, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit to the host.

From this very well-known definition, it is clear that, unlike drugs, probiotics might be useful in healthy subjects to reduce the risk of developing certain diseases or to optimise some physiological functions. They also may offer some advantages in already ill persons in relieving symptoms and signs, e.g. people with acute diarrhoea.

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indexA fascinating open paper was published in microbiome in 2013, and its suggested conclusions are now more prescient than ever, as the relationship between genotype, phenotype, and metabolic repertoire in the microbiome is understood to be non-linear.[1] The requirement for a certain functional diversity to ensure a well-functioning cooperative intestinal microbiota is crucial to break down various complex dietary compounds and divide metabolic tasks among different community members.

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A new study finds that when young people binge drink alcohol, it disrupts their immune system — and that disruption happens more quickly than drinkers might think.

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(2014) Antony Haynes: Auto Immunity 3

Tuesday, 16 September 2014 by

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Overview Auto-immunity has risen to the number one leading cause of mortality and morbidity in the world. You will be given an overview of the disposing factors required for the development of auto-immune conditions, including infections but focusing on dysbiosis & the relevance of the gastrointestinal microbiome. Case histories of patients with auto-immune conditions with

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Can proline-rich polypeptides (PRPs) protect your brain and even boost brain function? Studies in vitro on animals and humans support that idea. The neuro-protective cytokines in PRPs have a remarkably stabilizing effect on cognitive function in Alzheimer’s disease patients. In vitro studies show that PRPs inhibit fibrils and amyloid plaques.[1] PRPs also modulate intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), by regulating glutathione metabolism and antioxidant enzymes.[2] Gene expression analysis found that PRPs down-regulate genes involved in inflammatory pathways and increase levels of an Amyloid-beta (Aβ) hydrolyzing enzyme.[3] When given orally to mice, PRPs improve motor and sensory activities.[4] When mice are given either PRPs or plain colostrum, the PRP supplemented mice swim faster to a hidden platform.[5] PRPs also improve spatial learning and memory in older rats.[6]

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“Diet is a central issue when it comes to preserving our gastrointestinal health, because by eating and digesting we literally feed our gut microbiota, and thus influence its diversity and composition,” says the distinguished microbiota expert Professor Francisco Guarner (University Hospital Valld’Hebron, Barcelona, Spain).

If this balance is disturbed, it might result in a number of disorders, including functional bowel disorders, inflammatory bowel diseases and other immune mediated diseases, such as coeliac disease and certain allergies. Also, metabolic conditions, such as type 2 diabetes, and perhaps even behavioural disorders, such as autism and depression, can be linked to gut microbial imbalances. Although a disrupted microbial equilibrium can have many causes — infectious pathogens or use of antibiotics among them — the role of our daily food and lifestyle is crucial. Thus, the maintenance of our gastrointestinal health is to a considerable extent in our own hands.

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