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A Review of Larch Arabinogalactans

Thursday, 15 September 2016 by

5140371318326697Antony Haynes explores the potential mechanisms and actions of arabinogalactans, specifically from the Larch tree.

The reason for choosing this topic is due to the clinical improvements that have been witnessed from its use by numerous patients of my own and of other practitioners.

Larch arabinogalactans will be referred to as “L.A.”.

6267.cover-sourceRecent studies have suggested that gut bacteria play a fundamental role in diseases such as obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Data are accumulating in animal models and humans suggesting that obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D) are associated with a profound dysbiosis.[1]

First human metagenome-wide association studies demonstrated highly significant correlations of specific intestinal bacteria, certain bacterial genes and respective metabolic pathways with T2D. Importantly, especially butyrate-producing bacteria such as Roseburia intestinalis and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii concentrations were lower in T2D subjects.

Over the more recent past a number of strands of evolving discovery indicate that subsets of commensal microbes materially influence the gut and associated mucosal immune system. In particular the peripherally generated regulatory T cell has been seen as a powerful addition in maintaining mucosal homeostasis in the gut and provides unique benefits not delivered by thymically induced Treg alone.

For instance, colonisation with the bacterium Clostridia promotes extrathymic generation of regulatory T (Treg) cells that have a central role in the suppression of inflammatory and allergic responses.

A recent paper in the journal Swiss Medical Weekly explored the developing uses for the application of butyric acid in the management of human health.[1]

Butyric acid (BA) is a carboxylic acid with the formula CH3-CH2-CH2-COOH. It is frequently used in the veterinary field, especially in ruminant animals. Together with other short-chain fatty acids (propionic acid and acetic acid), BA is the principal source of energy produced by ruminal fermentation of cellulose and starch. In the field of zootechnics, butyric acid is used to improve the growth of bovine animals.[2] In humans, BA is synthesised by the colonic microflora (microbiota) during fermentation of digestible fibre, such as cereal flour, inulin, and psyllium.[3]

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