FORGOT YOUR DETAILS?

UntitledLiquid gold. Golden milk. That brilliant saffron-hued spice. We hear a lot about turmeric these days—also known as Curcuma longa—a member of the ginger family, and native of Southeast Asia.[i]  Valued for its brilliant hue and distinctive spicy-bitter flavor, its use as a dye, a spice, and in religious ceremonies dates back nearly 4000 years.[ii],[iii] Turmeric is a mainstay in Ayurvedic and Chinese medicine, thanks in large part to curcuminoids—three bright golden-colored, lipophilic polyphenols (curcumin, demethoxycurcumin and bisdemethoxycurcumin), collectively known as “curcumin” that are derived from the plant’s rhizomes.[iv],[v]  The main component of the root is a volatile oil containing turmerone.

Tagged under: , ,

The milieu and array of inflammatory cells and inflammatory mediators are crucially involved in the genesis, persistence and severity of pain following trauma, infection or nerve injury [1]. The mechanisms and pathways mediating pain and nociception (hyperalgesia) are transcriptionally regulated. The transcriptional mediator nuclear factor (NF)-κB plays a major role in regulating inflammatory responses, ostensibly via the control of gene expression/suppression. An association has recently emerged to establish a possible link between NF-kB and pain/nociception, purportedly through the regulation of the inflammatory loop and the secretion (biosynthesis) of pro-inflammatory mediators.

Recent findings suggest that the amino acid glutamine reduces Helicobacter pylori-associated pathology in mice and may therefore have similar effects in humans with gastric ulcers caused by H. pylori.

TOP