FORGOT YOUR DETAILS?

Reading Time: 3 minutes

BioMask on ArenThe influenza virus is a determined and relentless foe. Infecting about 1 billion people worldwide annually and killing hundreds of thousands. If influenza evolves into a pandemic strain, as it did three times last century, it could kill tens of millions.

Stripped to its genetic skeleton the virus that has wrought havoc on populations and caused untold misery is one of the simplest organisms on the planet. It consists of merely eight genes. Humans, on the other hand, have some 20,000 genes.

According to experts, in the first eight weeks of a flu pandemic, an effective mask could reduce the number of cases from one million to just 6. [1]

The Science of H1N1

Wednesday, 12 August 2009 by

Reading Time: < 1 minute

June 5, 2009 – Science & the CityPodcasts Top researchers offer an in-depth look at the science behind the global influenza outbreak, plus some of the work being done to keep us healthy. http://ne.edgecastcdn.net/000210/podcasts/060509flu.mp3   More at Science & the City Podcasts

Tagged under: ,
Reading Time: 2 minutes

untitled BMJ LogoComment: A paper out in the British Medical Journal on the 10th August 2009 [1] raises some interesting questions about the benefit of treating children under the age of 12 with neuraminidase inhibitors. This paper looked at 4 RCT’s involving 1766 children of whom 1243 had confirmed seasonal influenza A. Plus three RCT’s for the potential benefits of prophylaxis in 863 children.

Reading Time: 3 minutes

A Virus is an ultramicroscopic infectious agent.

The H1N1 A 2009 (Swine Flu)  is a novel strain of the influenza virus.

Viruses cannot reproduce on  their own. To reproduce, a virus must bind to a living cell inside some organism, insert its genetic material into that “host” cell, and take over the cell’s reproductive “machinery.” The virus then makes copies of itself – maybe hundreds of thousands. Sooner or later, this kills the infected cell – causing the virus to leave the cell and cause illness. Once out of the host cell new viruses start the process over, attacking other cells until the immune system, and or medication controls their activity and replication. The H1N1 Influenza A virus once inside a cell can produce approximately 100,000 new virions in about 8 hours.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

genetic changes of H1N1 virusIt is not generally appreciated that descendents of the H1N1 influenza A virus that caused the catastrophic and historic pandemic of 1918–1919 have persisted in humans for more than 90 years and have continued to contribute their genes to new viruses, causing new pandemics, epidemics, and epizootics.

Tagged under:
Reading Time: 2 minutes

covermedInvestigators from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and 25 other public health agencies around the world sought to determine the genetic origin and the antigenic characteristics of the 2009 A(H1N1) influenza virus, commonly referred to as “swine flu.” Specifically, they used a genetic-similarity study to determine which influenza strains previously identified had combined to produce the new A(H1N1) flu virus.

Tagged under: ,
Reading Time: 5 minutes

The World Health Organisation declared the first flu pandemic in 41 years on 11 June. As details of the global impact of the 2009 influenza A (H1N1) virus — and efforts to combat the threat — continues to unfold, Clinical Education provides evidence based nutritional strategies for optimising the mucosal barrier of prevention.

man sneezing

Flu Pandemic Underway

Tuesday, 16 June 2009 by
Reading Time: < 1 minute

Margaret Chan, the director-general of the World Health Organization (WHO), has officially declared the first global influenza pandemic in 41 years, for the A(H1N1) virus. “The world is now at the start of the 2009 pandemic,” she said. That makes it the fourth flu pandemic in a century, after 1918, 1957 and 1968. “The scientific criteria for a pandemic have been met,” she said; on 11 June the WHO moved to the topmost of its pandemic threat scale, phase 6, which indicates sustained community-level outbreaks in two or more countries in one other WHO region beyond initial community spread in one WHO region. “Further spread is considered inevitable,” she said.

Tagged under: , , ,
Reading Time: < 1 minute

The efficacy of a 2-month treatment with oral colostrum in the prevention of flu episodes compared with anti influenza vaccination was evaluated. Groups included healthy subjects without prophylaxis and those receiving both vaccination and colostrum. After 3 months of follow-up, the number of days with flu was 3 times higher in the non-colostrum subjects.

Reading Time: < 1 minute

The swine flu outbreak that began in Mexico and continues to spread around the globe may be particularly dangerous for young, otherwise healthy adults because it contains genetic components of the H5N1 avian influenza virus, which can induce a “cytokine storm,” in which a patient’s hyper-activated immune system causes potentially fatal damage to the lungs. Research studies and review articles exploring the regulation of cytokine responses in the lung and how infection-related dysregulation can cause a cytokine storm have been published in Viral Immunology, a peer-reviewed journal published by Mary Ann Liebert Inc.

Tagged under: , ,
TOP