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Apple Shaped Women at Risk

Friday, 09 August 2019 by

apple-shaped-risk (002)Postmenopausal women who carry fat around their middle are at a higher risk of early death, even if they have a healthy body mass index (#BMI). The authors of a new study, led by the University of Iowa, have concluded that it is not how heavy a person is but where they carry their weight which puts them at risk of obesity related health problems.

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A provocative article published in Nature Immunology[1] identifies the abject failure of public health’s policy of targeting diet and lifestyle changes in the reversal of the obesity epidemic. They also identify that obesity is a pro inflammatory state and as such promotes many of the chronic non infectious diseases and weakens immune resistance to infections that contribute to early death.

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A trial to see if the ingestion of a probiotic bacterium enriched drink might have a beneficial impact on central obesity was funded by Snow Brand Milk Products company in Japan and the results were published in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition this June 2010. [i]

Whilst it may seem a stretch that bacteria can influence our body mass, (I have written a previous review) it is an area of growing interest and investigation as bacteria have previously been implicated in the metabolic storage of fat. Studies in mice have shown up to 30% greater fat storage in mice with gastrointestinal colonies of commensals rather than their skinnier counterparts operating with sterile guts.

One proposal for this is that certain bacteria (Bacteroides Thetaiotaomicron is one likely contender) are able to manipulate energy to be stored in adipocytes through a pathway that involves microbial regulation of the intestinal epithelial expression of fasting-induced adipocyte protein (Fiaf), a circulating inhibitor of lipoprotein lipase (LPL).[ii]

The microbiota can then, based on this and other studies be viewed as a metabolic “organ” exquisitely tuned to our physiology and performing functions that we have not had to evolve on our own.

FAT? – I’m Not To Blame It’s My Genes!

Sunday, 04 April 2010 by | Comments: 4

Michael Ash BSc(Hons) DO ND FDipION reviews a selection of papers exploring the intersection between our genetic code and the style of food ingested in ever increasing amounts, in which fat and sugar make up the dominant components.

It’s clear from numerous studies that a sedentary lifestyle and a diet high in fat and sugar have profound effects on human mortality and morbidity through adverse weight gain.[1] The enormous human genome project, started in 2000 has also thrown up a number of markers in our approximately 21,000 genes related to an historical adaptive need to store fat when food was scarce and starvation an ever present threat. Some have interpreted this by saying that the reason they are obese or cannot lose weight is down to their genes, and that this may in turn abrogate them from actively altering lifestyle patterns, others have questioned the accuracy or validity of this causal relationship. [2],[3]

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Multi Vitamins are considered by many to be little more than colourful contributors to urine flow that reflect a gullible individuals need to add capital to the water course. I have addressed the major complications with this facile comment in a previous commentary.

A paper out in the March 2010 International Journal of Obesity[1] throws added weight to the triage theory of Prof Bruce Ames,[2] when additional nutrients were added to the dietary intake of obese Chinese females. It is already understood that obesity contributes to reduced bioavailability of minerals and vitamins and certainly contributes to reduced blood concentrations.

The team of researchers based at Harbin Medical University in China recruited 96 Chinese women with an average body mass index of 28kg/m2 and aged between 18-55 for the 6 month study.

Three groups were randomly set up, with one getting a multivimin, the next calcium only (162mg) and the last placebo. The results were compelling; the multivimin group had reduced body weight, body mass index, fat mass, total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol. On the positive side, they had an increased level of resting energy expenditure and HDL levels also increased. They also found reduced waist size and better breathing.

Vit D Deficiency = Fat Legs For Young Women!

Wednesday, 10 March 2010 by | Comments: 1

It’s hard to ignore, it really appears there is a genuine epidemic (occurrence of a disease or disorder in a population at a frequency higher than that expected in a given time period) in progress, and its not H1N1 Flu.

An excellently developed study published in the March 2010 Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism found a depressingly high  59% of study subjects had too little Vitamin D in their blood (</=29 ng/ml).[1] Nearly a quarter of the group had serious deficiencies (less than 20 ng/ml) of this important vitamin. Even the sufficient (>/=30 ng/ml) was only 41% and if we were to apply the generally regarded 50ng/ml as the base line for sufficiency, the numbers would decline even further. Since Vitamin D insufficiency is linked to increased body fat, decreased muscle strength and a range of disorders, this is a serious health issue.

The 90 young women in this group aged between 16-22yrs of age had an increased level of fatty tissue when their Vit D levels were low. Abnormal levels of Vitamin D are associated with a whole spectrum of diseases, including cancer, osteoporosis and diabetes, as well as cardiovascular and autoimmune disorders.

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