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Reading Time: 15 minutes

luteinIn Addition to Keeping Our Vision 20/20, These Nutrients Are Important for Brain and Skin Health, as Recent Research Highlights

If a multiple-choice test asked which organ the carotenoid lutein helps protect, and gave the options of the brain, eyes, or skin, many would select the eyes. Given lutein’s accumulation in the retina and other structures of the eye,[1] we do see a preponderance of research related to this organ. However, high levels of lutein are also found in the brain and skin.[2],[3]

Reading Time: 16 minutes

young brainThe Evidence Backing Nutritional Tools That Support Pediatric Brain Health and a Healthy Attention Span

Because of the pandemic, many parents have had substantially more one-on-one time with their children. And it has not been limited to the typical activities of being Mum and Dad, suddenly, there is the job of teaching as well. Getting kids to do their homework and stay on task seemed like a struggle back in 2019 but took on a whole new meaning in 2020.

Herein, we look at key nutrients that support paediatric brain health and, with this, a healthy attention span.

Astaxanthin: The Key to a New You

Thursday, 29 August 2019 by | Comments: 1
Reading Time: 9 minutes

shutterstock_1405527302 The Microalgae-Sourced Carotenoid That Delivers Broad Spectrum Antiaging Benefits

Pronounced “as-ta-ZAN-thin,” this word can be a mouthful at first. Even more of a mouthful is astaxanthin’s primary natural source, Haematococcus pluvialis, the microalgae that produces it as a protective antioxidant in response to light or other environmental stressors. Bright red in colour, this antioxidant bioaccumulates in organisms that eat it, and it is responsible for the pink to reddish hue of krill, shrimp, salmon, and even flamingos.

Astaxanthin is a potent antioxidant, with studies showing it provides significantly greater antioxidant protection than the carotenoids beta carotene, lycopene, and lutein as well as alpha-tocopherol, and thus it is considered one of the best agents for protecting cellular membranes.[1],[2],[3] Natural astaxanthin has been shown to be 20 times more potent than synthetic astaxanthin in eliminating free radicals.[4] Astaxanthin is not produced by mammals, so it must be obtained from the diet.[5]

Reading Time: 6 minutes

Dr Elisabeth Philipps Ph.D takes time out from her busy schedule to catch up on some great tomes. Summer is officially here! It’s that time of year when the long, hot and sunny days stretch out ahead of us and there seems like plenty of time to do all the things that we’ve been meaning

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Review of Homocysteine

Wednesday, 08 March 2017 by | Comments: 1
Reading Time: 8 minutes

homocysteine_fig_1By Antony Haynes BA,  Registered Nutritional Therapist

The word ‘homocysteine’ has entered the lexicon of familiar words over the past decade, at least for health practitioners, as has the term methylation, and the two are intimately connected.

What is Methylation?

Methylation denotes the addition of a methyl group on a substrate, or the substitution of an atom (or group) by a methyl group. Methylation is a form of alkylation, with a methyl group, rather than a larger carbon chain, replacing a hydrogen atom. Methylation is catalysed by enzymes.

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Although it himagesas already been known for some time that the brain does not remain rigid in its structure even in adulthood, scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences made a surprising discovery: The brain is not only able to adapt to changing conditions in long-term processes, but it can do so every month. The researchers observed that in women, in parallel to the rhythm of the level of oestrogen across their menstrual cycle, the structures of the Hippocampus vary — a brain area that is crucial for memories, mood and emotions.

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(Source: jama.jamanetwork.com)

The relationship between the gut and the nervous system—which includes the brain, peripheral, immune and enteric nervous systems—has become a hot area of research over the last 20 years. There is a proposed ‘axis of emotion’ that is subject to a constant reciprocal exchange of information using neural, immune, endocrine, metabolic and emotional pathways.

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Reading Time: 4 minutes

Forty years ago in Poland, scientists isolated an unusual immune modulating substance derived from colostrum. It seemed to be potent at fighting infection, but equally potent at calming inflammation. At the time the researchers simply called it colostrinin, but after a sequence analysis of its peptides (short chains of amino acids bound by peptide bonds), they concluded that colostrinin contained at least 32 different peptides, many of which were rich in proline.

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New evidence suggests that taking vitamin B supplements may help reduce the risk of stroke. The research appears in the September 18, 2013, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. [1]

Previous studies have conflicting findings regarding the use of vitamin B supplements and stroke or heart attack,” said author Xu Yuming, with Zhengzhou University in Zhengzhou, China.

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Reading Time: 16 minutes

Hidden in the stately steppes of gentle rice paddies, nestled in shiny clusters of red and purple palm fruit, lurking in tiny annatto seeds from the achiote tree… lies a quartet of potent anti-inflammatory, highly protective molecules called tocotrienols. They are cousins to the four tocopherols. Together, all eight comprise the Vitamin E family, a lipid-loving arsenal of molecules essential to health. Each has its own healing profile. According to molecular biochemist Chandan Sen, of Ohio State University, “Current studies of the biological functions of vitamin E continue to indicate that each member of the vitamin E family possesses unique biological functions often not shared by other family members.”[1]

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