FORGOT YOUR DETAILS?

Financial Benefits of Probiotics

Thursday, 24 October 2019 by

 

Financial-Benefits-of-ProbioticsOver the past month millions of children will have gone back to school, as well as bringing back enriched minds they may also be starting to bring various bugs and germs into the household. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, common colds are the main reason that children miss school and adults miss work. Absenteeism has a huge financial impact on businesses as well as vital educational hours missed for children. There is also a substantial strain on our health care system to care for those with acute respiratory tract infections (#RTIs). In recent years there has been a growing interest in the role #probiotics play on health outcomes. The University of California have recently published a study showing how probiotic use can lead to large economic and health savings.

Tagged under: , ,

Antibiotics-Increasing-the-risk-of-Rheumatoid-Arthritis#Rheumatoid #arthritis is a long-term autoimmune condition that causes pain, swelling and stiffness in the #joints. A combination of genetic and environmental factors are suspected to be the cause for rheumatoid arthritis (#RA) including hormonal changes, exposure to dust and other allergens as well as some bacterial and viral infections. A team of researchers from Keele University, Haywood Academic Rheumatology Centre and Quadram Institute Bioscience have been studying the link between taking #antibiotics and going on to develop RA.

Antibiotic Harm to Children

Friday, 23 August 2019 by

Antibiotics-causing-more-harm-than-goodResearchers from Oxford, Cardiff and Southampton Universities have been studying the dangers of overprescribing #antibiotics for common #respiratory tract illnesses in children, concluding that children given two or more courses in a year are 30% more likely to have further doses fail. The research was published by the British Journal of General Practice and analysed patient records of more than 250,000 preschool children.

indexThe growing knowledge in research communities concerning the symbiotic relationship we have with our bacterial organism population is increasingly reflecting that which we have been discussing for many years – namely the use of antibiotics (and many of our current lifestyle habits) is not a benign event in terms of microbiome outcomes. It seems that even short pulses of widely used antibiotics (amoxicillin and tylosin in this paper) can lead to long-term development changes in mouse pups, including increased body mass and bone growth and changes to the gut microbiota, according to a study published in Nature Communications.[1]

Your gastrointestinal tract is home to complex microbial populations, which, collectively, are referred to as the microbiota. The relation between the microbiota and you – the host is meant to be symbiotic, with you providing a warm moist physical niche and suitable food to intestinal bacteria and then if all works well you in turn gain benefit from the enhancement of resistance to infection and the improved facilitation of the absorption of ingested food [1],[2]

Long implicated in numerous adverse events linked to intestinal immunity and associated mucosal tolerance a recent presentation at the American Academy of Allergy Asthma &Immunology annual meeting has shown a credible causation link between antibiotics and allergy.[1]

In their retrospective case–control study, presented as a late-breaking abstract at the meeting, Dr. Love and colleagues found an almost 2-fold increase in food allergy in children exposed to 3 or more courses of antibiotics between the ages of 7 and 12 months.

Tagged under: , ,

Antibiotics and IBD in Childhood

Wednesday, 09 March 2011 by

Inflammatory Bowel Disease such as Ulcerative Colitis and Crohn’s blight people’s lives and restrict their functionality. The formative years of our lives represents the time when microbiological partnerships are being formed to provide lifelong co-dependence on each other. The role of the microbiota in immune tolerance in the gut and elsewhere is increasingly understood but is still an area rich for investigation.

In this study of Danish children a nationwide cohort study was conducted of all Danish singleton children born from 1995 to 2003 (N=577,627) with individual-level information on filled antibiotic prescriptions, IBD and potential confounding variables.[1] Using Poisson regression, rate ratios (RRs) of IBD were calculated according to antibiotic use. Antibiotic use was classified according to time since use, type, number of courses used and age at use.

Tagged under: , ,

Antibiotics; How Do They Work?

Monday, 04 October 2010 by | Comments: 1

Nutritional orientated practitioners are well aware of the potentially damaging effects of inappropriate prescribing of antibiotics, not simply in terms of increasing resistance but also because even a single treatment can alter the microbial ecology in the gut for months without relevant interventions.

Antiobiotics have undoubtedly been a fantastic intervention, the discovery of the sulfa drugs in the 1930 s and the subsequent development of penicillin during World War II ushered in a new era in the treatment of infectious diseases. Infections that were common causes of death and disease in the pre-antibiotic era – rheumatic fever, syphilis, cellulitis and bacterial pneumonia – became treatable, and over the next 20 years most of the classes of antibiotics that find clinical use today were discovered and changed medicine in a profound way.[i]

Tagged under: ,

One in 10 schoolchildren in the western world suffers from eczema and even developing nations have also seen an increasing trend in the last few decades. There are many proposals to explain the increased incidence, one area of relevance is the environmental impact. Falling under the often misused ‘hygeine hypothesis’ title it has been proposed that there is a reflective difference in the gradient between rural and urban children. Implying the environmental impact on the developing immune system of children is different and therefore less protective in the urban setting.

This concept has now been studied in a recent article in the British Journal of Dermatology.[1] By conducting a Medline and Embase data base review studies that compared the incidence between the two environments were reviewed. Some 26 papers were assessed with 19 demonstrating a higher risk for eczema in an urbanised area, of these 11 were regarded as being statistically significant. A further 6 studies showed a lower risk of eczema in an urbanised area, of which just 1 was statistically significant.

A Bacteria Triggers Arthritis.

Thursday, 01 July 2010 by | Comments: 2

The gut microbiomes of humans and mice are broadly similar which is helpful as this paper has used the mouse model to explain how a resident bacteria in the gut can induce arthritis. In both hosts human and mouse upwards of ∼1000 different microbial species from ∼10 different divisions colonise the gastrointestinal tract, but just two bacterial divisions—the Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes—and one member of the Archaea appear to dominate, together accounting for ∼98% of the 16S rRNA sequences obtained from this site.[1] 16SrRNA is a laboratory method for analysing bacterial and provides species-specific signature sequences useful for bacterial identification but is not routinely used in diagnostic settings yet.

Their analysis revealed that despite the enormous species variation in the gut a single species of bacteria that lives here is able to trigger a cascade of immune responses that can ultimately result in the development of arthritis.[2] Gut-residing bacteria can also play a role in disorders of the immune system, especially autoimmune disorders in which the body attacks its own cells. The gut microbiota is now known to shape intestinal immune responses during health and disease with systemic effects.

TOP