BJNThe British Journal of Nutrition published a review paper in July 2015, exploring the relationship between inflammation, diet and health. Whilst this is neither new nor novel, the momentum is becoming clear. There is a steady awareness in research that the consumption of certain foods and the absence of others contributes to a provocative change in defence molecules with the result that many of the non-communicable diseases that blight western health care can develop and thrive.

This open access article is well worth saving for those refresh reads.[1]

The importance of chronic low-grade inflammation in the pathology of numerous age-related chronic conditions is now clear. An unresolved inflammatory response is likely to be involved from the early stages of disease development.

Tagged under: , ,

home_coverA group studied the effects of apples in a mouse model to determine if there was a positive consequence in the changes related to bacterial communities and inflammation markers.[1]

Apples are rich in polyphenols, which provide antioxidant properties, mediation of cellular processes such as inflammation, and modulation of gut microbiota. In this study we compared genetically engineered apples with increased flavonoids [myeloblastis transcription factor 10 (MYB10)] with nontransformed apples from the same genotype, “Royal Gala” (RG), and a control diet with no apple.

s_cover_y1114For some time now, the idea that at least in part, depression is the manifestation of loss of control over defensive inflammation and that inappropriate induction of these historical  mechanisms, for a prolonged period will induce changes in behaviour and mood has been gaining ground

Whilst single intervention treatments aimed at reducing the binding of inflammation proteins and fats to key receptors or the induction and conversion of mediators are reductionist in thinking, they may also represent a primary point of care helping people recover some of their function and allowing them time to work on solving the cause.

Tagged under: ,

The remedies for gastrointestinal complaints are legion and stretch back far in human history. Ancient Chinese physicians prescribed anise for flatulence, while Dioscorides, chief physician for the Roman army, recommended garlic for parasites. Many are effective and stand the test of time, but contemporary scientific research on novel extracts offers up surprising new finds. The Asian plant, Perilla (Perilla frutescens) for example, offers valuable assistance in the management of functional gut problems.

As each month goes by the dynamic and intersecting relationships between our gastrointestinal organisms and the food we consume continues to open all sorts of opportunities for comprehension and treatments. Faced as the western and many non-western cultures are with the expansion of non-communicable diseases and inflammatory disorders, the idea of simply suppressing a abnormal response to a common trigger is losing some of its appeal – there is no doubt that pharmaceuticals have tremendous clinical benefits, but faced with the decision to use a drug every day for life, or to make lifestyle changes – many people are opting for the lifestyle option.

But…. it also appears to offer far more than simply compressing overall body mass. For some time the world of gluten sensitivity as well as the pathology coeliac disease have been experiencing a substantial amount of increased scientific and lay interest. The long held critique that most Nutritional Therapist suggest avoiding gluten in the absence of CD is a needless and just a fallacious recommendation has come under increasing credibility attack.

Faecal Transplant (FT) and IBD

Tuesday, 25 September 2012 by | Comments: 2

I have explored the role of appropriate transplantation in the resolution of MRSA infection that fails to resolve with antibiotic therapy, and have intimated that other conditions of the bowel and linked tissues may also benefit. The model is: that loss of mucosal tolerance underlies the pathology of inflammatory bowel disease and is also linked to irritable bowel syndrome. These altered states of function reflect a combination of environmental, genetic and emotional events that coalesce into a wide range of conditions.

It is a global phenomenon – the increase in gastrointestinal inflammatory disease over the last 50 years, so fast is this occurring that genetic drift is very unlikely to be attributable as causal; but it is likely that changes in diet and lifestyle amongst the genetically susceptible act as triggering agents to induce aberrant immune responses that lead to inflammatory bowel disease and other systemic inflammatory illnesses.

In a fascinating study published in Nature on the 13th June in their letters section a group of researchers show how the inclusion of fats derived from milk, change the bacterial composition in the gastrointestinal tracts of mice promoting the development of colitis.[1]

Michael E. Ash BSc DO ND, Robert Settenari M.S and Prof. Garth L. Nicolson Ph.D explain the relationship between energy deficit, mitochondrial membrane quality, the immune system, inflammation and how to recover from persistent fatigue using validated natural medicine.

GUT is one of my favourite journals, as they regularly explore the ‘alternative’ approaches to colon health management with a vigour that appeases the clinician in me, and a rigour that calms the scientist.

A paper published in early 2012[1] add’s further knowledge to the role that probiotics and the active components produced by lactic acid bacteria have on mucosal health and intestinal balance. An especially pleasing discovery – for an old long term user of this word – is their inclusion of the term dysbiosis, with a summary explanation in the opening paragraph, as there is no abstract. I have reproduced it below: