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‘Nutritional Dark Matter’

Monday, 20 January 2020 by

Nutritional dark matter‘You are what you eat’, the maxim made memorable thanks to Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin in 1826, is as important now as it was then. The vital role #diet plays in #health has been widely documented, but our understanding widely rests on the 150 #nutritional components tracked by national databases which only represent a small section of the 26,000 definable biochemicals in the food supply. This wide range of chemical diversity remains largely invisible both to us and to epidemiological studies, yet the number is only expected to rise as detection techniques improve, leading to a far greater understanding of the links between our diet and health.

functional medicine improves health related quality of lifeThe first retrospective cohort study of the #functional #medicine model has recently been published in the Journal of American Medical Association Network Open (#JAMA). The study saw researchers from the Cleveland Clinic’s Center for Functional Medicine examine 1,595 patients they had treated there, as well as 5,657 patients seen in primary care at a family health centre. All patients had their health-related quality of life (#QoL) assessed using a patient-reported outcomes measurement information system (#PROMIS). The National Institute of Health (#NIH) validated questionnaires, measured patients physical and mental health across a period of 12 months.

Healthy Choices, Healthy Planet

Thursday, 14 November 2019 by

Healthy Food Choices Make for a Healthy PlanetThe evidence for the health benefits of a varied, nutrient dense diet are vast, but new evidence has shown that by making healthy choices for our bodies we could also have a positive effect on the environment. Michael Clark from the University of Oxford led a study looking into both the health and environmental impacts of 15 different types of food groups, including fruits, vegetables, nuts, dairy, eggs, red meat, fish, olive oil, legumes and sugar-sweetened beverages. The scientists examined the food-dependent linkages between and among five diet-dependent health outcomes in adults- type II #diabetes, #stroke, #coronary heart disease, #colorectal cancer and mortality- and 5 different environmental impacts of producing the foods.

Review of Homocysteine

Wednesday, 08 March 2017 by | Comments: 1

homocysteine_fig_1By Antony Haynes BA,  Registered Nutritional Therapist

The word ‘homocysteine’ has entered the lexicon of familiar words over the past decade, at least for health practitioners, as has the term methylation, and the two are intimately connected.

What is Methylation?

Methylation denotes the addition of a methyl group on a substrate, or the substitution of an atom (or group) by a methyl group. Methylation is a form of alkylation, with a methyl group, rather than a larger carbon chain, replacing a hydrogen atom. Methylation is catalysed by enzymes.

Although it himagesas already been known for some time that the brain does not remain rigid in its structure even in adulthood, scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences made a surprising discovery: The brain is not only able to adapt to changing conditions in long-term processes, but it can do so every month. The researchers observed that in women, in parallel to the rhythm of the level of oestrogen across their menstrual cycle, the structures of the Hippocampus vary — a brain area that is crucial for memories, mood and emotions.

Review of Migraines

Wednesday, 31 August 2016 by

HeadacheAntony Haynes BA, RNT explores the nutritional links with Migraines. The recent heat wave in England in July 2016 with blue, cloudless skies & over 30 degree temperatures has been welcomed by most. However, some people suffer migraines in the bright sunshine, and this is what prompted me to focus on this subject matter, because I used to suffer from completely debilitating migraines myself after playing tennis in the bright sunshine. You may listen to the podcast of this piece here.

This is a review of the subject of migraines and of research into the possible role of key nutrients in the resolution of this disabling condition. You can read this document on the screen, and that gives you the opportunity of viewing the many references provided at the end. The review will take a brief look at the definition and description of migraine, then the incidence of it throughout the world, and then and of most interest, at the possible nutritional interventions that may bring some relief to sufferers.

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imagesAntony Haynes BA(Hons) RNT undertakes a review of NeuroBiogenic Amines from a nutritional perspective. If you would like to listen rather than read, do visit the associated podcast here

This is a brief review of NeuroBiogenic Amines (NBA). The aim is to introduce you the names of the most important NBAs and describe briefly the functions that they have.

Next, the intention is to share with you information about a new lab test for them and lastly, & of utmost relevance to Nutritional Therapists, it will be described how one might then use nutritional intervention to support a balance of these all important brain chemicals and thereby have a significant impact on a person’s health & well-being.

Although the death rate from stroke is declining (mostly), it is rising for other neurologic diseases such as Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease (PD). As opposed to Alzheimers we can pinpoint the abnormality in the brain that leads to PD, which involves a substantial destruction of the dopamine-producing neurons in the substantia nigra. By the time an individual has lost 50%-70% of the dopamine-producing neurons in this region, the symptoms of PD, such as tremor, slowness of movement, rigidity, and impaired balance and coordination, are already apparent.

You might think that simply giving dopamine ( as is currently the primary therapy) would resolve the symptoms, but any of the initial benefits of dopamine soon erode, leaving the patient trapped in a body that is increasingly less responsive. We also know that PD is associated with neuroinflammation and energy system dysfuntion (these two events are interlinked). Therefore, we need a therapy that assists both to offer a greater opportunity of clinical success.[1]

A recent article in Medscape (Expert Rev Clin Immunol. 2013;9(8):735-747.) looked at the role of foods in the management of IBD. The author Lynette Ferguson summarised some of the key areas, and this summary is a synopsis of her paper.

Inflammatory bowel disease includes ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease, which are both inflammatory disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. Both types of inflammatory bowel disease have a complex aetiology, resulting from a genetically determined susceptibility interacting with environmental factors, including the diet and gut microbiota. Genome Wide Association Studies have implicated more than 160 single-nucleotide polymorphisms in disease susceptibility. Consideration of the different pathways suggested to be involved implies that specific dietary interventions are likely to be appropriate, dependent upon the nature of the genes involved. Epigenetics and the gut microbiota are also responsive to dietary interventions. Nutrigenetics may lead to personalized nutrition for disease prevention and treatment, while nutrigenomics may help to understand the nature of the disease and individual response to nutrients.

At the International Liver Congress 2013: 48th Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL). An abstract was presented exploring the role of probiotics in the reduction of risk for development of hepatic encephalopathy Abstract 78. Presented April 26, 2013.

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