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Over the more recent past a number of strands of evolving discovery indicate that subsets of commensal microbes materially influence the gut and associated mucosal immune system. In particular the peripherally generated regulatory T cell has been seen as a powerful addition in maintaining mucosal homeostasis in the gut and provides unique benefits not delivered by thymically induced Treg alone.

For instance, colonisation with the bacterium Clostridia promotes extrathymic generation of regulatory T (Treg) cells that have a central role in the suppression of inflammatory and allergic responses.

Apples Can Suppress IBD

Monday, 12 December 2011 by | Comments: 2

Here’s another reason why “an apple a day keeps the doctor away”—according to new research findings published in the Journal of Leukocyte Biology (https://www.jleukbio.org), oral ingestion of apple polyphenols (antioxidants found in apple peels) can suppress T cell activation to prevent colitis in mice.[1] This study is the first to show a role for T cells in polyphenol-mediated protection against an autoimmune disease and could lead to new therapies and treatments for people with disorders related to bowel inflammation, such as ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease and colitis-associated colorectal cancer.

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Immune system regulation is of paramount importance to host survival. In settings of autoimmunity and alloimmunity, control is lost, resulting in injury to vital organs and tissues. Naturally occurring, thymic-derived T regulatory (Treg) cells that express CD4, CD25, and the forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3) are potent suppressors of these adverse immune responses. Preclinical studies

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