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journalFor some years the notion that adverse responses to environmental triggers may be increasing due to a change in the ongoing exposure to mild immune activating bacteria has been gaining credibility. From Strachans first proposals to now there has been a continuous evolution of the hygiene hypothesis.[1],[2]

  • Hygiene hypothesis – criticised as being too vague, including by Professor Strachan himself
  • Microbial hypothesis (avoiding an overemphasis on cleanliness) and the
  • Old friends hypothesis (implying that microbes that were beneficial for immune system development have been eliminated or replaced).
  • Biodiversity hypothesis expands the hygiene hypothesis to the living environment in general,
  • Biome depletion model views the hygiene hypothesis as an evolutionary mismatch that works in tandem with other mismatches, such as inflammatory diets or vitamin A, D or K deficiency, which undermine immune function in westernised societies.
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PR-cover-v78_n2.inddFor some time now there has been a growing body of supportive evidence that the relationship between the bacteria in our digestive tract and our central nervous system may not be as tenuous as some may like to think. In a recent study published in Pediatric Research[1] a retrospective review of data in a small but informative group of children, indicates there may be a positive relationship between the use of a well studied probiotic and reduced risk of developing neuropsychiatric illness.

journal_logoThe use of Saccharomyces Boulardii as a therapeutic intervention in people with alterations in their microbiota and local immune responses has been explored for over 50 years. The multiple points of action this simple yeast initiates in terms of mucosal barrier function and immune competence has made it an attractive and safe product for many clinicians. This study published in Jun 2014 in the American Society for Microbiology explores its role in a mouse model, but opens some interesting prospects for human health.[1]

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