FORGOT YOUR DETAILS?

imagesAntony Haynes BA, RNT reviews an interesting development in the management of progressive MS through the use of high dose biotin.

This is a review of the recent research from 2015 and 2016 which shows that the vitamin biotin, at high doses, may have a role to play in progressive MS. You may listen to this as a podcast here.

Personally, I do not have any direct clinical experience of the use of biotin but I have already recommended it to my patients who have MS of the progressive kind. When I or any colleagues of mine have any positive outcomes to report, we can share this via another podcast.

Functional Medicine Vs Multiple Sclerosis.

Wednesday, 10 April 2013 by | Comments: 3

The role of food in health is sometimes seen as an abstract process, and many clinicians prefer to sink into the banal balanced food concept to avoid any detailed analysis or change of their patients food intake. Functional medicine trains clinicians and practitioners to reject the model of one diet fits all and to use the research materials available to construct healthy focussed food programmes. An example of just how effective this can be is found in the story of Dr Wahls, extracted from her web site http://www.terrywahls.com/ the following is her introduction. I encourage you to watch her videos and bath yourself in the unexpected joy that her outcomes promote.

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Autoimmunity and the Worm

Saturday, 17 November 2012 by

An immunologist, Dr Joel Weinstock provoked mixed reactions from the scientific community when he suggested that in line with Strachan’s hygiene theory[1] and Rook’s ‘old friend’s theory,[2] that the removal from the western world of helminths, had provided the opportunity for inflammatory diseases of the bowel and elsewhere to increase in frequency.[3] 20 years on from Strachan’s first proposals and Weinstock’s hypothesis have been examined in human trials and found to be effective, and the human microbiome project has uncovered other interesting relationship’s.[4]

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Sunshine & Vit D Reduce Risk of MS

Wednesday, 09 February 2011 by

A recent paper out of Australia and published in the Journal Neurology supports the increasing correlative link between Vit D and neurological damage such as demyelination.[1]

In a case-control study, more time spent in the sun — beginning in childhood — independently predicted lower risk of having a first demyelinating event with 30% lower adjusted odds for each 1,000 kJ/m2 of vitamin D-producing ultraviolet rays, according to Robyn M. Lucas, PhD, of the Australian National University in Canberra, and colleagues.

Serum vitamin D levels also independently predicted MS incidence with 7% lower risk of a first event per 10 nmol/L higher 25-hydroxyvitamin D (95% confidence interval 0.86 to 1.00), the group reported in the Feb. 8 issue of Neurology.

-Por.Media 7/2 coverVit D Essential for MS Patients

This collective review focuses on three major factors that influence the incidences of multiple sclerosis (MS) to include ultraviolet radiation (UVR), vitamin D3 supplementation, and vitamin D receptor gene (VDRG) polymorphisms.

In general, the rate of MS increases with latitude. Individuals tend to carry their original risk with them if they migrate to a different latitude after adolescence. It is important to emphasise that UVR increases the synthesis of vitamin D3, which has a known immune suppressant action via the VDRG. Clinical studies have pointed out that vitamin D deficiency may exacerbate the development of MS.

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