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The Gut-Liver Axis

Monday, 17 September 2018 by

Nature_Reviews_Gastroenterology_Hepatology_250x329The relationship between the contents, metabolites, barrier and immune response of the gut and organs and function in the body are becoming well understood, albeit there are many nuances associated with this relationship yet to be quantified.

One area in which the dynamic interaction between the gut and a specific organ is rapidly rising up the knowledge tree is the ‘gut and liver axis’. In large part this is due to the increase in the prevalence of liver related inflammation, of which non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is becoming a global problem. For with the global rise of obesity and the associated metabolic syndrome, there has been an equally alarming and related rise in the incidence of NAFLD and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) – the hepatic manifestations of the metabolic syndrome and the predominant chronic liver diseases worldwide[1]

CPD_0.previewA research paper published in Jan 2017 (behind a paywall) in the journal Current Pharmaceutical Design, asks an interesting question about cruciferous vegetables.[1] They go onto explore the relationship of the breakdown products from the digestive effects and microbial conversions and conclude that these have multiple points of beneficial intervention.

indexA fascinating open paper was published in microbiome in 2013, and its suggested conclusions are now more prescient than ever, as the relationship between genotype, phenotype, and metabolic repertoire in the microbiome is understood to be non-linear.[1] The requirement for a certain functional diversity to ensure a well-functioning cooperative intestinal microbiota is crucial to break down various complex dietary compounds and divide metabolic tasks among different community members.

Bugs, Guts and Research

Tuesday, 18 October 2011 by

For the majority of the last 100 years the role of bacteria in human health has been explored in terms of risk to health and well-being, the ‘bad bug = bad health’ paradigm. The result has been a combination of remarkable benefits against infectious related deaths and a slow but steady development of chronic non communicable diseases (CNCDs) – cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes and respiratory diseases now kill more people worldwide than all other diseases combined.

This rate of demise will continue to rise in the coming years as the global population ages, sedentary lifestyles and inappropriate food consumption continues to spread across the world.

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