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Reading Time: 10 minutes

types_of_sources_02-2012Dr Carrie Decker ND and Michael Ash DO, ND, RNT explore the role of natural agents in assisting the bodys healing capacity from damage linked to particulates. In a recent article, mechanisms by which the particulate matter (PM) found in air pollution may be detrimental to  health were discussed, as well as how specific antioxidants, cell membrane specific lipids and some of the B vitamins may offset this damage. Here, we dive deeper into these potential issues and the importance of supporting the body in the process of ongoing cellular repair and detoxification.

Reading Time: 7 minutes

Our cell membranes are both lipid soluble and lipid loving. Their bilayered lipid membranes form a highly active skin that is constantly interacting with the internal and external environment, ferrying in nutrients and releasing waste. Liposomes, in turn, are microscopic phospholipid bubbles with a bilayered membrane structure that is similar to our cells. They are already widely used in the pharmaceutical industry to improve efficacy and safety of anticancer drugs, antifungal drugs, and anaesthetics. In fact, Mother Nature loves them, too. A 2000 study found that liposomes are naturally present in breast milk. [1]

The Gut Microbiota and ME/CFS

Thursday, 15 August 2013 by
Reading Time: 3 minutes

A paper out in the journal Anaerobe explores the potential role of our commensal bacteria and the development and progression of chronic fatigue syndrome, also known as myalgic encephalomyelitis.[1]

Developing a theme started in part by the Australian scientist Thomas Borody and colleagues[2] in which they utilised the method of faecal transplant therapy and identified that 70% of the patients responded initially and after a prolonged follow up period ((15-20 years) found that 58% had a sustained response, suggesting that the relationship between bacteria in the digestive tract and symptoms of CFIDS may have a credible mechanism for intervention.

Reading Time: 14 minutes

Schematic representation of mechanisms accounting for mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilisation

by: Michael Ash BSc DO ND F.DipION+, Prof. Garth L. Nicolson, Ph.D.*

+Clinical Education, Devon UK

*Department of Molecular Pathology, The Institute for Molecular Medicine, Huntington Beach, CA 92647

If the fundamental biological maxim– ‘structure subserves function’ – remains paramount, the evolutionary commitment to generating, managing and maintaining the vast array of lipids required by humans to survive and prosper has presented science with a complex task to fully elucidate our lipid repertoire and determine their biological functions. .  Arguably the most important of these lipids are the phospholipids that are the mainstay of all cellular membranes. The wide variety of cellular and organelle membranes and the existence of special membrane lipid regions and domains allows for the design of specific lipid replacement therapies to support and maintain the structure and function of cellular membranes. The authors discuss some of the biological processes and evolving strategies related to lipid replacement therapy and its use along with antioxidants for the constitutive management of mitochondrial and other cellular membranes as well as the functional gains from the utilisation of lipid replacement to improve cellular membranes biological functions.

Reading Time: 13 minutes

Michael E. Ash BSc DO ND, Robert Settenari M.S and Prof. Garth L. Nicolson Ph.D explain the relationship between energy deficit, mitochondrial membrane quality, the immune system, inflammation and how to recover from persistent fatigue using validated natural medicine.

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