FORGOT YOUR DETAILS?

2015dec_logoDear Integrative Medicine Practitioners and Clients:

Recently, Patricia Kane of Neurolipid.org and BodyBio.com of New Jersey, USA, sent an email to the medical and scientific communities disparaging and mischaracterizing NTFactor®, a patented product from Nutritional Therapeutics of New York (NTI). This email stated that NTFactor® was used in a research study at East Carolina University in North Carolina authored by Dr Saame Shaikh et al. (Biochemistry 2014; 53(35):5589-5591). Statements made by Patricia Kane, PhD that NTFactor® was used in this in vitro research study are false.

In the decision making that we as consumers make when we select foods, it is rare that we also consider the mutual needs of our bacteria found in the gut. Yet we have co-evolved with those bacteria over millennia. As scientists continue to study the intricate signalling that takes place between that which we ingest and that which we bacterially metabolize, they turn up new evidence of significant beneficial partnerships.

The Singer-Nicolson Fluid-Mosaic Model of the cell’s lipid membrane is making scientific news again. The model, along with clinical evidence for the effectiveness of oral lipid replacement therapy (LRT), has recently been the subject of several peer review scientific papers. LRT is proving to be a valid method for restoring lipid membranes damaged by chronic infection and oxidative stress. New articles by Garth Nicolson, PhD and Michael Ash, DO, ND, BSc appear in Elsevier’s Biochimica et Biophysica Acta, and articles by Dr. Nicolson also appear in the newly Harvard-launched journal, Discoveries, as well as Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine. Here, we summarize the clinical findings.

It isn’t every newsletter issue that FOCUS has the privilege of featuring a scientist whose theory of a fundamental biological phenomenon is accepted throughout the biological and medical sciences as the standard textbook model. Such is the case with S. J. Singer’s and Garth Nicolson’s landmark theory of the Fluid Mosaic Model of cell membranes. This model, proposed in 1972 and published in the prestigious journal SCIENCE, has been called a “unified theory” of the cell membrane. This model has been tested and retested for many decades, and it is now believed to accurately predict the structure and behaviour of all cellular membranes. Over the intervening years this theory has been confirmed by many sophisticated physical and chemical techniques, including one known as freeze-fracture electron microscopy.

In the mid-1960s I had the honour of working with Professor S. J. Singer on the Fluid Mosaic Model of Biological Membranes for my doctoral thesis. At the time the cell membrane was thought to be a rather static three-layer structure with lipids sandwiched in between protein inner and outer layers. However, we knew that this static 3-layer structure did not fit with the wide range of physical and chemical information that had recently become available on membrane structure.

By Dr Stephen Levine PhD.

This issue of FOCUS has special meaning for me. It reaches back in time to the incredible excitement generated in the early 1970’s by the stunning discoveries of Singer and Nicolson. These two scientists deciphered the actual biochemical structure of the cellular membrane. They called it the Lipid Bi-Layer Fluid Mosaic Model. I was a graduate student in genetics at UC Berkeley. Their model was talked about in laboratories, over lunch tables, and in classrooms. It was a truly exciting time.

TOP