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9-coverWhen asked, what is the best diet to follow, there is normally a wide range of options provided. These are mostly based on contemporary patterns, ethical, religious, geographical and preference. However, whilst all dietary practices have aspects that are lauded over, one style of eating consistently supports general benefit to the consumer. That is the traditional Mediterranean diet (MD), defined as: A nutritionally recommended dietary pattern characterised by high-level intake of fruit, vegetables, legumes, nuts and minimally processed cereals, moderately high consumption of fish, low intake of saturated fat, meat and dairy products and regular, but moderate, consumption of alcohol. Unesco has recognised the Mediterranean diet (MD) as an intangible cultural heritage.

A Review of Larch Arabinogalactans

Thursday, 15 September 2016 by

5140371318326697Antony Haynes explores the potential mechanisms and actions of arabinogalactans, specifically from the Larch tree.

The reason for choosing this topic is due to the clinical improvements that have been witnessed from its use by numerous patients of my own and of other practitioners.

Larch arabinogalactans will be referred to as “L.A.”.

Conclusions Patients complaining of flatulence have a poor tolerance of intestinal gas, which is associated with instability of the microbial ecosystem.[1]

Significance of this study

What is already known on this subject?

  • Some patients specifically complain of excessive evacuation of gas per anus.
  • Intestinal gas content depends by-and-large on gas production by bacterial fermentation of unabsorbed substrates.
  • Diet influences anal gas evacuation and gut microbial composition.
  • A proportion of patients complaining of flatulence have increased number of gas evacuations, but the net volume of gas evacuated is within the normal range.
  • Flatulence is associated with abdominal symptoms.

As each month goes by the dynamic and intersecting relationships between our gastrointestinal organisms and the food we consume continues to open all sorts of opportunities for comprehension and treatments. Faced as the western and many non-western cultures are with the expansion of non-communicable diseases and inflammatory disorders, the idea of simply suppressing a abnormal response to a common trigger is losing some of its appeal – there is no doubt that pharmaceuticals have tremendous clinical benefits, but faced with the decision to use a drug every day for life, or to make lifestyle changes – many people are opting for the lifestyle option.

Michael Ash BSc, DO, ND FDipION

The fields of immunology, microbiology, nutrition, epigenetics and metabolism are rapidly converging utilising a systems biology methodology to explain our intimate relationships with our microbial cohabitants. For over 30 years data has been building to scientifically support the hypothesis that intestinal cohabitants operate in a collective manner with macro and micro food intakes to shape and define our immune systems from an early age. The result is a collective impact bound by mutual cooperation that may have unintended consequences including a wide range of pathologies.

cover_natureWhilst to nutritionists and most people who understand the role of nutrients in health, the idea that the bacteria in our gut impacts on disease risk seems almost common knowledge, there is still a shortage of hard science to back this up. In the international journal Nature, periodic examples of how science is catching up appear. In the Oct 29th edition an article out of Australia really adds some substance to the role of food and bacteria in health and disease.

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