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The Gut Microbiota and ME/CFS

Thursday, 15 August 2013 by
Reading Time: 3 minutes

A paper out in the journal Anaerobe explores the potential role of our commensal bacteria and the development and progression of chronic fatigue syndrome, also known as myalgic encephalomyelitis.[1]

Developing a theme started in part by the Australian scientist Thomas Borody and colleagues[2] in which they utilised the method of faecal transplant therapy and identified that 70% of the patients responded initially and after a prolonged follow up period ((15-20 years) found that 58% had a sustained response, suggesting that the relationship between bacteria in the digestive tract and symptoms of CFIDS may have a credible mechanism for intervention.

Reading Time: 5 minutes

In numerous earlier posts I have explored the emerging evidence as well as the historical experiences for the use of faecal microbial transplantation (FMT) and the management of complex dysbiotic gastrointestinal tracts: this is also sometimes called faecal transplant therapy (FTT)

Whilst the greatest amount of data on this therapy is available with reference to the successful (>92%) treatment of clostridium difficile infection, others have been exploring its potential treatment in regard to other complaints related to dysbiosis of the gastrointestinal flora.

Faecal Transplant (FT) and IBD

Tuesday, 25 September 2012 by | Comments: 2
Reading Time: 2 minutes

I have explored the role of appropriate transplantation in the resolution of MRSA infection that fails to resolve with antibiotic therapy, and have intimated that other conditions of the bowel and linked tissues may also benefit. The model is: that loss of mucosal tolerance underlies the pathology of inflammatory bowel disease and is also linked to irritable bowel syndrome. These altered states of function reflect a combination of environmental, genetic and emotional events that coalesce into a wide range of conditions.

Reading Time: 2 minutes

I have written a number of times about the role of faecal transplantation in the established intervention for Clostridium difficile and have hinted at the possible cross mechanism benefits of inducing commensal bacteria that favour tolerance into the gastrointestinal tract. The implication being, that individuals experiencing illness driven by loss of immunological tolerance, not simply within the digestive tract, but systemically may benefit from an evolutionary transplant.

Pass the POO/Medicine

Thursday, 21 April 2011 by | Comments: 2
Reading Time: 10 minutes

Faecal Bacteria

As many will know if they read the reviews I compile, I have an over 20 year interest in the role of the mucosal immune system (mainly in the gut) and its effects on human health, beyond the local tissues and organs.

The gastrointestinal tract is rooted in what is gently chided by the dedicated science/medical community as ‘folk medicine’, and for thousands of years healers, shaman and other practitioners have applied their best efforts to securing the gut as the seat of all disease.

In Asian medicine the abdomen is recognised as the seat of the soul the “Honoured Middle” (onaka) and the centre of spiritual and physical strength (Hara) is how the Japanese describe the intestine. [1] Yet for many Europeans and North Americans it is largely a tube which simply has to function albeit increasingly less efficiently.

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