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Digestive Enzymes

Wednesday, 11 January 2017 by | Comments: 3

digestive-enzymeElisabeth Phillips PhD and Antony Haynes BA, RNT explore the role and nature of digestive enzymes, to unlock some of the mystery around their role in human health and supplementation.

Digestive enzymes catalyse (cause or accelerate (a reaction) by acting as a catalyst) the breakdown of food in the mouth and gut so nutrients are released and can be absorbed across the intestinal barrier into the blood stream. Therefore, one of the main functions of digestive enzymes is to increase the bioavailability of nutrients.

nrgastro.2013.141-f2Dr Carrie Decker ND, explores the possible risk reduction benefits achieved by enzymatic breakdown of inadvertant exposure to gluten peptides. Individuals who experience coeliac disease or Non-Coeliac Gluten Sensitivity (NCGS) are at risk for exposure to gluten in many settings. Although the home setting can be fairly well controlled by elimination gluten or utilising cooking strategies to separate gluten-containing foods from those that are gluten-free, many restaurants and homes of friends and family often are not as well versed in making foods that are gluten-free.

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1368550803996Dr Carrie Decker ND, explores the potential management of indavertent ingestion of gluten, which for those people needing to exclude exposure to these proteins and lead a life that includes eating foods that have not been prepared at home, can be a significant risk to well being.

Coeliac disease (CD) is the most studied and broadly recognised disease associated with the immune reaction to gluten consumption, however other types of ‘gluten sensitivity’ also exist. These conditions are broadly known as Non-Coeliac Gluten Sensitivity (NCGS). The immune response to gluten proteins and polypeptide regions varies, but may involve the innate immune system, class I or class II mediated reactions, and antibody recognition.[1] The topic of NCGS is being increasingly studied, as is evidenced in the following quote extracted from an article in Nutrients:- “Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity: The New Frontier of Gluten Related Disorders”[2]:

At Last a Good Use for Coca Cola?

Wednesday, 23 January 2013 by

Now it is unlikely that when I mention the problem for which a recent publication in in the January 2013 issue of Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics confirmed Coca Colas therapeutic use, that you have either heard of it, or will ever see it in clinic.[1]

However, the spin on this use is the effect of coca cola and the implications for its continued ingestion, especially when eating.

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