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Joints inflamedHow the essential mineral boron, cartilage-derived proteoglycans, and a bioavailable form of curcumin may be your best allies for keeping joints healthy as you age by Dr Carrie Decker ND

Gravity. From our first days on this earth, we are combating its effects. Falls and tumbles in our youth all too fast progress to sagging skin, joints that hurt when we exercise, and our dwindling height. Our capacity for growth and the regenerative nature of our cells and tissues becomes progressively less with age, particularly in tissues such as our skin and those that form our joints. With this we see the joint changes associated with osteoarthritis and a loss of skin elasticity and wound-healing capacity.[i],[ii],[iii],[iv]  

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UntitledLiquid gold. Golden milk. That brilliant saffron-hued spice. We hear a lot about turmeric these days—also known as Curcuma longa—a member of the ginger family, and native of Southeast Asia.[i]  Valued for its brilliant hue and distinctive spicy-bitter flavor, its use as a dye, a spice, and in religious ceremonies dates back nearly 4000 years.[ii],[iii] Turmeric is a mainstay in Ayurvedic and Chinese medicine, thanks in large part to curcuminoids—three bright golden-colored, lipophilic polyphenols (curcumin, demethoxycurcumin and bisdemethoxycurcumin), collectively known as “curcumin” that are derived from the plant’s rhizomes.[iv],[v]  The main component of the root is a volatile oil containing turmerone.

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Published in the March 6 issue of the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, the early findings show that vitamin D3 may activate key genes and cellular signalling networks to help stimulate the immune system to clear the amyloid-beta protein.[1]

Previous laboratory work by the team demonstrated that specific types of immune cells in patients with Alzheimer’s disease may respond to therapy with vitamin D3 and curcumin, a chemical found in turmeric spice, by stimulating the innate immune system to clear amyloid beta. But the researchers didn’t know how it worked.

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Resveratrol Adds Another Benefit

Wednesday, 05 May 2010 by | Comments: 2

Ulcerative colitis is a nonspecific inflammatory disorder characterised by oxidative and nitrosative stress, leucocyte infiltration and upregulation of inflammatory mediators. Resveratrol is a polyphenolic compound found in grapes and wine, with multiple pharmacological actions, mainly anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antitumour and immunomodulatory activities.

Inflammatory bowel disease is a recognised as a chronic pathology by uncontrolled inflammation of the intestinal mucosa which can affect part of the gastrointestinal tract, with causes including genetic factors, immune deregulation, barrier dysfunction, and a loss of immune tolerance toward the enteric flora.

Michael Ash BSc(Hons) DO, ND, DipION reviews the possibility that strategically selected foods and food concentrates represent a valid therapy for inflammatory illnesses.

There is substantive interest in the potential translation from bench to bedside of simple safe strategies to modify the adverse effects of inflammation. Approaching from a preventative and restorative angle the numbers of papers being published on the role of orally ingested bacteria (probiotics) and in this article – the herb Tumeric (active ingredient of which is curcumin) is presenting increasingly supportive evidence for their reasonable and safe clinical use.

Modern analytical techniques are helping to reveal novel opportunities for inflammation control in the gut and the systemic tissues in new ways that even a few years ago would have been thought of as very alternative!

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