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Vit D and IBD

Tuesday, 30 June 2015 by

3.coverA research paper published in the United European Gastroenterology Journal showed that if you are experiencing a period of remission with Cohn’s disease that Vitamin D confers additional benefit in restoring/maintaining appropriate gut permeability.[1]

In this small study – some 27 people were involved, all of whom were determined to be in remission at the time of the oral supplementation with either 2000 iu of vitamin D or a placebo for 90 days. They found, that patients treated with the supplementation were more likely to maintain their intestinal permeability, whereas this deteriorated in the placebo group. Increased intestinal permeability is considered a measure of gut leakiness, which is shown to predict and precede clinical relapse in CD. In addition, patients with the highest blood levels of vitamin D had signs of reduced inflammation (measured by C-reactive protein and antimicrobial peptides), and these patients also reported better quality of life.

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In numerous earlier posts I have explored the emerging evidence as well as the historical experiences for the use of faecal microbial transplantation (FMT) and the management of complex dysbiotic gastrointestinal tracts: this is also sometimes called faecal transplant therapy (FTT)

Whilst the greatest amount of data on this therapy is available with reference to the successful (>92%) treatment of clostridium difficile infection, others have been exploring its potential treatment in regard to other complaints related to dysbiosis of the gastrointestinal flora.

A dietary selection of more traditional fibre rich foods especially broccoli, appears to confer an immunological advantage to those patients suffering from the inflammatory bowel disease: Crohn’s. A paper published in the prestigious journal GUT recognised that Crohn’s is more common in industrialised nations than in those eating a more traditional diet. The study demonstrates that modern food ingredient called polysorbate 80 increases inflammation by altering the barrier integrity.[1]

Polysorbate 80 is a nonionic surfactant and emulsifier derived from polyethoxylated  sorbitan  and oleic acid, and is often used in foods. Polysorbate 80 is a viscous, water-soluble yellow liquid.

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Crohn’s and Ulcerative colitis are understood to have a number of genetic related risks, but increasingly scientists are having to accept that our double helix does not predict our health risks except in a few single gene diseases such as cystic fibrosis, the haemoglobinopathies. In fact the enormous endeavours and resources spent pursuing this elucidation have produced surprisingly modest practical benefits.

Even when dozens of genes have been linked to a trait, both the individual and cumulative effects are surprisingly small and nowhere near enough to explain earlier estimates of heritability.[1]

The recent discovery by a New Zealand group that there are a number of childhood factors associated with the development of Inflammatory Bowel Disease, further supports the concept that environment – in this case during childhood plays an important role in modulating the risk for developing these conditions. The rising incidence of these diseases over the last 50 years also supports the role of environment, as genes take many hundreds of years to change.[2]

Vitamin D Vs Crohn’s (IBD) & Cancer

Wednesday, 10 February 2010 by

Crohns disease is an inflammatory disease of the intestines that may affect any part of the gastrointestinal tract from anus to mouth, causing a wide variety of symptoms. It primarily causes abdominal pain, diarrhoea (which may be bloody), vomiting, or weight loss, but may also cause complications outside of the gastrointestinal tract such as skin rashes, arthritis and inflammation of the eye.[1]

A new study has found that Vitamin D, readily available in supplements or cod liver oil, can counter the effects of Crohn’s disease.[2]

The data collated in this study suggests, for the first time, that Vitamin D deficiency can contribute to Crohn’s disease. Epidemiologically it had already been noted that people from northern countries, which receive less sunlight, necessary for the fabrication of Vitamin D by the human body, are particularly vulnerable to Crohn’s disease.[3]

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