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Although the death rate from stroke is declining (mostly), it is rising for other neurologic diseases such as Alzheimer disease and Parkinson disease (PD). As opposed to Alzheimers we can pinpoint the abnormality in the brain that leads to PD, which involves a substantial destruction of the dopamine-producing neurons in the substantia nigra. By the time an individual has lost 50%-70% of the dopamine-producing neurons in this region, the symptoms of PD, such as tremor, slowness of movement, rigidity, and impaired balance and coordination, are already apparent.

You might think that simply giving dopamine ( as is currently the primary therapy) would resolve the symptoms, but any of the initial benefits of dopamine soon erode, leaving the patient trapped in a body that is increasingly less responsive. We also know that PD is associated with neuroinflammation and energy system dysfuntion (these two events are interlinked). Therefore, we need a therapy that assists both to offer a greater opportunity of clinical success.[1]

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