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nm.3625-F1

Unraveling the Truth About Antioxidants: ROS and disease: finding the right balance. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24999942

Antioxidant Therapies Address Common Underpinnings of These Chronic Conditions

There is not a day that goes by that healthcare practitioners don’t face challenges. Attending to many complex patients stacked back-to-back, communicating bad news to a patient, working with insurance to cover labs—most physicians encounter at least one of these, if not all three, each and every day. One of the additional challenges we face with complex patients is addressing a long list of diagnoses; as integrative providers, we often find ourselves trying to treat not just one, but often three or four health concerns in a single visit. With our broad education and tolle totum (treat the whole person) vision, it is difficult to avoid this tendency.

Fortunately, there are many nutritional therapies that address conditions we commonly see coexisting. Here, we look at factors in a set of conditions that commonly overlap: chronic fatigue syndrome, depression, and insomnia. More importantly, we discuss some shared solutions that will help the integrative practitioner support patients with these difficulties.

Common Underpinnings

Reading Time: 13 minutes

Michael E. Ash BSc DO ND, Robert Settenari M.S and Prof. Garth L. Nicolson Ph.D explain the relationship between energy deficit, mitochondrial membrane quality, the immune system, inflammation and how to recover from persistent fatigue using validated natural medicine.

Chronic Fatigue – XMRV?

Thursday, 14 July 2011 by | Comments: 5
Reading Time: 2 minutes

Back in In the issue of 23 October 2009, Science published a study by Lombardi et al. purporting to show that a retrovirus called XMRV (xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus) was present in the blood of 67% of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) compared with 3.7% of healthy controls.[1]

This as everyone will recall, attracted a great deal of scientific and patient derived interest, but there has been considerable lack of success in the replication of these findings by other investigative groups.

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Chronic Fatigue and the Mysterious XMRV Link

Thursday, 26 August 2010 by | Comments: 1
Reading Time: 3 minutes

Everyone who suffers with this condition and the many thousands of practitioners involved in their health recovery are interested in whether there may be a causal agent identifiable through appropriate tests – not that there is a treatment on offer, but more a case of validation I suspect. This topic has attracted a great deal of attention in the orthodox and alternative medicine world and has some time to go before the explanations become viable treatments. Keeping up to speed with the science will assist all practitioners in their potential application.

The debate over XMRV began back in 2009 when researchers led by Judy Mikovits of the Whittemore Peterson Institute (WPI) for Neuro-Immune Disease in Reno, Nevada, reported in Science: traces of the virus in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, a type of white blood cell, of 67% of CFS patients. By contrast, only 3.4% of healthy controls were found to harbour the virus. The team also showed that XMRV could infect human cells and concluded that the virus—which had previously been linked to prostate cancer—might play a role in causing CFS.

Reading Time: 36 minutes

Approaches to Curing Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis, Fibromyalgia, Multiple Chemical Sensitivity, Gulf War Syndrome and Possibly Many Others by Martin L. Pall, PhD

From the Townsend Letter
February / March 2010

Abstract

The NO/ONOO− cycle is a biochemical vicious cycle that is thought to cause such diseases as chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME), multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS), fibromyalgia (FM), and possibly a large number of other chronic inflammatory diseases. The chemistry/biochemistry of the cycle predicts that the primary mechanism is local such the depending on where it is localized in the body, it may cause a variety of different diseases. Previous studies have shown that agents that lower such cycle elements as oxidative stress, nitric oxide, inflammatory responses, mitochondrial dysfunction, tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) depletion and NMDA activity produce clinical improvements in CFS/ME and FM patients, consistent with the predictions of the cycle mechanism. Multiagent protocols lowering several aspects of the cycle appear to be the most promising approaches to therapy. These include an entirely over-the-counter nutritional support protocol developed by the author in conjunction with the Allergy Research Group. However, such

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