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Astaxanthin: The Key to a New You

Thursday, 29 August 2019 by

shutterstock_1405527302 The Microalgae-Sourced Carotenoid That Delivers Broad Spectrum Antiaging Benefits

Pronounced “as-ta-ZAN-thin,” this word can be a mouthful at first. Even more of a mouthful is astaxanthin’s primary natural source, Haematococcus pluvialis, the microalgae that produces it as a protective antioxidant in response to light or other environmental stressors. Bright red in colour, this antioxidant bioaccumulates in organisms that eat it, and it is responsible for the pink to reddish hue of krill, shrimp, salmon, and even flamingos.

Astaxanthin is a potent antioxidant, with studies showing it provides significantly greater antioxidant protection than the carotenoids beta carotene, lycopene, and lutein as well as alpha-tocopherol, and thus it is considered one of the best agents for protecting cellular membranes.[1],[2],[3] Natural astaxanthin has been shown to be 20 times more potent than synthetic astaxanthin in eliminating free radicals.[4] Astaxanthin is not produced by mammals, so it must be obtained from the diet.[5]

types_of_sources_02-2012Dr Carrie Decker ND and Michael Ash DO, ND, RNT explore the role of natural agents in assisting the bodys healing capacity from damage linked to particulates. In a recent article, mechanisms by which the particulate matter (PM) found in air pollution may be detrimental to  health were discussed, as well as how specific antioxidants, cell membrane specific lipids and some of the B vitamins may offset this damage. Here, we dive deeper into these potential issues and the importance of supporting the body in the process of ongoing cellular repair and detoxification.

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