FORGOT YOUR DETAILS?

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sept_2016_cover_277468_5_w360So, at what point do you seriously consider being a recipient of another person’s faecal material, surely one would have to be at deaths door to make that determination? Well, your first response may still be ‘Yuck’, even though we have been discussing the merits and potential benefits of triggering a restructuring of the microbiota for some years now. Well let’s say that the implications for beneficial outcome in a wide range of problems exists (subject to finding enough suitable donors) but that Clostrium Difficile resolution is the condition where most are currently preparing to confer credibility.

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I have written a number of times about the role of faecal transplantation in the established intervention for Clostridium difficile and have hinted at the possible cross mechanism benefits of inducing commensal bacteria that favour tolerance into the gastrointestinal tract. The implication being, that individuals experiencing illness driven by loss of immunological tolerance, not simply within the digestive tract, but systemically may benefit from an evolutionary transplant.

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I have previously discussed the use of faecal transplant therapy as an effective treatment for the pervasive infectious agent C.Diff. This is a serious often difficult to resolve bacterial infection that occurs primarily whilst patients are hospitalised but is not limited only to residential care.

C. difficile infections tripled between 1996 and 2005, and they now affect about 84 out of every 100,000 people.

Pass the POO/Medicine

Thursday, 21 April 2011 by | Comments: 2
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Faecal Bacteria

As many will know if they read the reviews I compile, I have an over 20 year interest in the role of the mucosal immune system (mainly in the gut) and its effects on human health, beyond the local tissues and organs.

The gastrointestinal tract is rooted in what is gently chided by the dedicated science/medical community as ‘folk medicine’, and for thousands of years healers, shaman and other practitioners have applied their best efforts to securing the gut as the seat of all disease.

In Asian medicine the abdomen is recognised as the seat of the soul the “Honoured Middle” (onaka) and the centre of spiritual and physical strength (Hara) is how the Japanese describe the intestine. [1] Yet for many Europeans and North Americans it is largely a tube which simply has to function albeit increasingly less efficiently.

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