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journal.jpgIt has been proposed that risk for developing the autoimmune condition coeliac disease (CD) may be linked to the time that the infant is weaned to consume gluten containing foods. However, the timing of gluten introduction into an infant’s diet does not appear to influence a child’s subsequent risk of developing CD investigators report in an article published online January 19 in Pediatrics.[1] The new finding, from a multinational prospective birth cohort study, challenges some current ideas on how best to prevent the onset of the autoimmune disorder.

The Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition (SACN) and the Committee on Toxicity (COT) are both advisory committees of independent experts that provide advice to the Department of Health and Food Standards Agency in the United Kingdom.[1]

In March 2011, the committees jointly completed an in-depth review examining the most appropriate time to introduce gluten into an infant’s diet. They considered the available evidence to see whether the time that gluten is introduced into an infant’s diet affects the likelihood of developing coeliac disease and type 1 diabetes mellitus.

For a number of years I have written, lectured, discussed and treated people with the emerging confidence that the application of benign, but signalling specific human derived bacteria would have benefits in terms of mucosal tolerance. One of the areas I have been most interested in has been the use of lactic acid bacteria as an immune modifying organism. As the first 1,000 days of a human’s life represent the ones in which immune activity is most responsive, the implication is that early stage supplementation – even in utero supplementation will have a modifying effect on some risk factors associated with a loss of mucosal tolerance.

Breast is Best for Gut Bacteria

Wednesday, 09 May 2012 by

Whilst the findings may seem consistent with our current understanding of the relationships between the gastrointestinal tracts bacterial maturation and immune functionality – the relationship between competence and breast milk, from a neonate’s immune perspective has been expanded following the publication of this study in Genome Biology.[1]

It has been considered over the last few years to advise mothers during pregnancy and whilst breast feeding to avoid allergenic foods such as milk, nuts, and other risky foods to reduce the risk of childhood allergy. Not for the first time researchers say this practice may be doing more harm than good. Research papers presented at a recent American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology conference suggests that exposure may be better than avoidance.[1]

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