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Calcium Supplements Do Not Prevent Fractures

Friday, 09 October 2015 by | Comments: 1

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The recommendation for consumption of calcium over the typically recognised minimum official recommendations in the UK and Nordic countries of 700-800 mg/day of dietary calcium for adults appears to have no substantive benefit on fracture prevention. There is currently little, if any, firm evidence that higher intakes prevent bone loss, falls, or fractures in middle aged and older women and men living in the community.[1],[2]

Calcium deficiency in the elderly is associated with low gastric acid secretion and bone loss. A new study linking defects in gastric acid secretion with bone destruction and impaired mineralization bolsters the view that calcium supplements can prevent these bone defects-but do they all work. This paper suggests that altered acidification of the stomach and specific gene deficiencies will dictate the form of calcium supplementation most suitable for the reduction and resolution of osteoporosis.

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