FORGOT YOUR DETAILS?

Bile Acids and Mucosal Immunity

Monday, 26 August 2019 by

The-Importance-of-Bile-Acids-to-our-HealthBile acids are critical for the digestion and absorption of fats and fat-soluble vitamins in the small intestine. Recent studies suggest bile acids have further functions as pleotropic signalling metabolites able to interact with germline-encoded host receptors and microbiota to regulate an array of #metabolic and #inflammatory pathways. Researchers from The Scripps Research Institute Florida and Osaka University Japan have recently published a piece discussing the interplay between bile acids, the microbiota and the mucosal immune system. They focus on how this interplay can regulate intestinal homeostasis and inflammation. The dynamic three-dimensional interplay between #bile acids, the microbiome and the mucosal immune system represents an important new frontier in the field of Mucosal Immunology. 

224231As functional disorders of the gut continue to increase in occurrence and develop in frequency across all population groups, a broad based review in the Journal Digestive Disorders published in Feb 2018 is a welcome chance to tease out elements of discord and dysbiosis that present opportunities for personalised intervention.[1]

Background and Summary: Traditionally, functional gastro­intestinal disorders (FGID), including functional dyspepsia or irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), are defined by more or less specific symptoms and the absence of structural or bio­chemical abnormalities that cause these symptoms. This concept is now considered to be outdated; if appropriate tests are applied, structural or biochemical abnormalities that explain or cause the symptoms may be found in many patients. Another feature of FGID are the highly prevalent psychiatric comorbidities, such as depression and anxiety.

Tagged under: , , , ,

At first sight one may wonder why a paper published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology is being highlighted on this web site.[1] Yet Dr Guiney and his colleagues have evolved a very elegant approach to complex metabolically relevant data collection using a simple, non-invasive test that should be celebrated as an example a combination of science, economics and human/animal care, sometimes assumed not to exist in large research establishments. This paper expanded on a previous study published in 2010.[2]

TOP