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2015dec_logoAs a master herbalist, he considers herbs exceptionally complex and contends that usually the whole herb works best as the body takes what it needs from the full spectrum of components in the whole herb. “They are not “raw drugs,” he has said, “though they may still be viewed in that manner by the Western model. Most possess between 100 and 1,000 chemical constituents and have complex actions within the body.  They are gifts that nature has provided.”  What follows is an excerpt from his book, Healing Lyme.

2015dec_logoDear Integrative Medicine Practitioners and Clients:

Recently, Patricia Kane of Neurolipid.org and BodyBio.com of New Jersey, USA, sent an email to the medical and scientific communities disparaging and mischaracterizing NTFactor®, a patented product from Nutritional Therapeutics of New York (NTI). This email stated that NTFactor® was used in a research study at East Carolina University in North Carolina authored by Dr Saame Shaikh et al. (Biochemistry 2014; 53(35):5589-5591). Statements made by Patricia Kane, PhD that NTFactor® was used in this in vitro research study are false.

2015dec_logoDr. Todd A. Born, is a naturopathic doctor, co-owner and medical director of Born Naturopathic Associates, Inc., in Alameda, California. Dr. Born is also the Product Manager, Head of New Product Development, Scientific Advisor for Allergy Research Group, LLC and is Editor-in-Chief of their science Focus Newsletter. He is a Thought Leader for the UK-based Clinical Education, a free peer-to-peer service that offers clinicians a closed forum to ask clinical questions and receive evidence-based responses by experts in their fields.

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2015dec_logoGuidelines for diagnosing coeliac disease are rapidly evolving, as sensitive and specific laboratory assays are now available as part of the coeliac disease diagnostic algorithm. Though biopsy is still recommended as a gold standard by many gastroenterologists1, biopsies may still be inconclusive.2 Therefore, in many cases it may be possible to diagnose coeliac easily and quickly via a few essential blood tests. These include immunoglobulins produced against tissue transglutaminase (tTG) and deamidated gliadin peptide (DGP).

2015dec_logoFood sensitivities are not the same as food intolerance’s. If we interchangeably use those two terms, we can undermine genuine problems people experience when consuming provocative foods, in particular wheat and other gluten containing foods.

For this reason it is important to clearly define the difference between food sensitivity and food intolerance. According to the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases based in the USA, a food intolerance occurs when:

indexFor people with obsessive compulsive disorders the condition can be extremely exhausting. For practitioners and clinicians the condition is very frustrating to manage and to bring relief safely and reproducibly. The use of the nutrient N-Acetyl Cysteine as an adjunctive intervention has been explored in a small number of clinical trials, this review paper takes a systematic approach and brings together the evidence to help determine if this single intervention has any clinical value.[1]

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ClinicalIn a clinical trial undertaken by Hudson and King from Kennesaw State University, people with a gluten sensitivity were given an enzyme to aid in the degradation of gluten chains so that periodic or accidental exposure to gluten could be mediated through suitable enzyme assistance.[1]

The enzyme produced by Deerland, showed considerable benefit in terms of a variety of symptoms experienced by people with gluten sensitivity after exposure to gluten. In the double-blind, placebo based human clinical study, participants showed statistically significant improvements in a wide variety of common digestive issues while taking Glutalytic.

Calcium Supplements Do Not Prevent Fractures

Friday, 09 October 2015 by | Comments: 1

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The recommendation for consumption of calcium over the typically recognised minimum official recommendations in the UK and Nordic countries of 700-800 mg/day of dietary calcium for adults appears to have no substantive benefit on fracture prevention. There is currently little, if any, firm evidence that higher intakes prevent bone loss, falls, or fractures in middle aged and older women and men living in the community.[1],[2]

1368550803996Dr Carrie Decker ND, explores the potential management of indavertent ingestion of gluten, which for those people needing to exclude exposure to these proteins and lead a life that includes eating foods that have not been prepared at home, can be a significant risk to well being.

Coeliac disease (CD) is the most studied and broadly recognised disease associated with the immune reaction to gluten consumption, however other types of ‘gluten sensitivity’ also exist. These conditions are broadly known as Non-Coeliac Gluten Sensitivity (NCGS). The immune response to gluten proteins and polypeptide regions varies, but may involve the innate immune system, class I or class II mediated reactions, and antibody recognition.[1] The topic of NCGS is being increasingly studied, as is evidenced in the following quote extracted from an article in Nutrients:- “Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity: The New Frontier of Gluten Related Disorders”[2]:

8.coverUnless you have been hiding away from all published materials you will be aware that Monash University in Australia have proposed and others have supported that for people with irritable bowel syndrome, that following a diet low in FODMAP (fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides, and polyols content will result in symptom resolution.

Yet here at Clinical Education we have stressed that following this diet has risks of key nutrient insufficiencies and in particular those foods rich in aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonists, which are vital for gut mucosal immune balance and competence. In effect the use of a low FODMAP diet for long term health is not justified, but short term intervention may be helpful.

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