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(Source: jama.jamanetwork.com)

The relationship between the gut and the nervous system—which includes the brain, peripheral, immune and enteric nervous systems—has become a hot area of research over the last 20 years. There is a proposed ‘axis of emotion’ that is subject to a constant reciprocal exchange of information using neural, immune, endocrine, metabolic and emotional pathways.

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cover_natureA paper in Nature back in 2014 noted that artificial non-caloric sweeteners (NAS) when consumed by mice had a detrimental effect of their metabolic health and microbiota, and the authors suggested that this connection may be an indication of risk in humans who consume these additives. The study used three artificial sweeteners: saccharin, sucralose (which is Splenda®), and aspartame.

World Life Expectancy

Wednesday, 16 March 2016 by

248828_532029486825621_1378888775_nThere are of course many explanations posited for why some people experience a long and healthy life and others do not. They are always of interest and depending on personal preferences may well either support the lifestyle being undertaken or challenge deeply held views, and we know that isn’t always welcome.

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08A review article in Gastroenterologica e Dietologica explores the evidence for the use of LGG as a therapeutic probiotic.[1] Probiotics are becoming increasingly important in basic and clinical research, but they are also a subject of considerable economic interest due to their expanding popularity. They are live micro-organisms which, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit to the host.

From this very well-known definition, it is clear that, unlike drugs, probiotics might be useful in healthy subjects to reduce the risk of developing certain diseases or to optimise some physiological functions. They also may offer some advantages in already ill persons in relieving symptoms and signs, e.g. people with acute diarrhoea.

6267.cover-sourceRecent studies have suggested that gut bacteria play a fundamental role in diseases such as obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Data are accumulating in animal models and humans suggesting that obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D) are associated with a profound dysbiosis.[1]

First human metagenome-wide association studies demonstrated highly significant correlations of specific intestinal bacteria, certain bacterial genes and respective metabolic pathways with T2D. Importantly, especially butyrate-producing bacteria such as Roseburia intestinalis and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii concentrations were lower in T2D subjects.

2015dec_logoAs a master herbalist, he considers herbs exceptionally complex and contends that usually the whole herb works best as the body takes what it needs from the full spectrum of components in the whole herb. “They are not “raw drugs,” he has said, “though they may still be viewed in that manner by the Western model. Most possess between 100 and 1,000 chemical constituents and have complex actions within the body.  They are gifts that nature has provided.”  What follows is an excerpt from his book, Healing Lyme.

2015dec_logoDear Integrative Medicine Practitioners and Clients:

Recently, Patricia Kane of Neurolipid.org and BodyBio.com of New Jersey, USA, sent an email to the medical and scientific communities disparaging and mischaracterizing NTFactor®, a patented product from Nutritional Therapeutics of New York (NTI). This email stated that NTFactor® was used in a research study at East Carolina University in North Carolina authored by Dr Saame Shaikh et al. (Biochemistry 2014; 53(35):5589-5591). Statements made by Patricia Kane, PhD that NTFactor® was used in this in vitro research study are false.

2015dec_logoDr. Todd A. Born, is a naturopathic doctor, co-owner and medical director of Born Naturopathic Associates, Inc., in Alameda, California. Dr. Born is also the Product Manager, Head of New Product Development, Scientific Advisor for Allergy Research Group, LLC and is Editor-in-Chief of their science Focus Newsletter. He is a Thought Leader for the UK-based Clinical Education, a free peer-to-peer service that offers clinicians a closed forum to ask clinical questions and receive evidence-based responses by experts in their fields.

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2015dec_logoGuidelines for diagnosing coeliac disease are rapidly evolving, as sensitive and specific laboratory assays are now available as part of the coeliac disease diagnostic algorithm. Though biopsy is still recommended as a gold standard by many gastroenterologists1, biopsies may still be inconclusive.2 Therefore, in many cases it may be possible to diagnose coeliac easily and quickly via a few essential blood tests. These include immunoglobulins produced against tissue transglutaminase (tTG) and deamidated gliadin peptide (DGP).

2015dec_logoFood sensitivities are not the same as food intolerance’s. If we interchangeably use those two terms, we can undermine genuine problems people experience when consuming provocative foods, in particular wheat and other gluten containing foods.

For this reason it is important to clearly define the difference between food sensitivity and food intolerance. According to the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases based in the USA, a food intolerance occurs when:

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