histamine_intoleranceDr Carrie Decker ND, explores the mechanisms behind the increasingly recognised and better understood intolerance to histamine (1% of population are likely to suffer). Responsible for a wide range of apparently unconnected symptoms, the ingestion of histamine containing foods by someone ill equipped to adequately render the amine neutralised can result in an unpleasant series of functional problems.

cov200hConcerns about mortality and these days morbidity settle on people’s shoulders at different times and with different weights. Some are blissfully immune to risk association with decisions and others become frozen into indecision because of fears that manifest as a result of exposure to dubious or credible sources.

Today there seems a relentless list of non-modifiable risks that provide challenges to a healthy and vibrant long life, from terrorism, economic collapse, wars, infection, pollution, agrichemicals and more. A whole industry is set up to disseminate these concerns in a relentless barrage of news, insight, opinion and at times hysteria.

1368550803996Dr Carrie Decker ND, explores the potential management of indavertent ingestion of gluten, which for those people needing to exclude exposure to these proteins and lead a life that includes eating foods that have not been prepared at home, can be a significant risk to well being.

Coeliac disease (CD) is the most studied and broadly recognised disease associated with the immune reaction to gluten consumption, however other types of ‘gluten sensitivity’ also exist. These conditions are broadly known as Non-Coeliac Gluten Sensitivity (NCGS). The immune response to gluten proteins and polypeptide regions varies, but may involve the innate immune system, class I or class II mediated reactions, and antibody recognition.[1] The topic of NCGS is being increasingly studied, as is evidenced in the following quote extracted from an article in Nutrients:- “Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity: The New Frontier of Gluten Related Disorders”[2]:

cov200hPublished in the Journal Allergy and Clinical Immunology July 2015, a research paper explores the relationship between anti-inflammatory lipids in food and risk of allergic responses.[1]

The Karolinska Institute in Sweden is a world famous research centre, and scientists there explored the notion that increasing omega three fatty acids through dietary ingestion may confer benefit in a subset of people, chosen by age. Specifically they wanted to see if eating oily fish would reduce the risk of rhinitis in school children – for those of you with school children of your own, you know already that this has an effect on them, and you!

journalFor some years the notion that adverse responses to environmental triggers may be increasing due to a change in the ongoing exposure to mild immune activating bacteria has been gaining credibility. From Strachans first proposals to now there has been a continuous evolution of the hygiene hypothesis.[1],[2]

  • Hygiene hypothesis – criticised as being too vague, including by Professor Strachan himself
  • Microbial hypothesis (avoiding an overemphasis on cleanliness) and the
  • Old friends hypothesis (implying that microbes that were beneficial for immune system development have been eliminated or replaced).
  • Biodiversity hypothesis expands the hygiene hypothesis to the living environment in general,
  • Biome depletion model views the hygiene hypothesis as an evolutionary mismatch that works in tandem with other mismatches, such as inflammatory diets or vitamin A, D or K deficiency, which undermine immune function in westernised societies.
Tagged under: , , , , ,

8.coverUnless you have been hiding away from all published materials you will be aware that Monash University in Australia have proposed and others have supported that for people with irritable bowel syndrome, that following a diet low in FODMAP (fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides, and polyols content will result in symptom resolution.

Yet here at Clinical Education we have stressed that following this diet has risks of key nutrient insufficiencies and in particular those foods rich in aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonists, which are vital for gut mucosal immune balance and competence. In effect the use of a low FODMAP diet for long term health is not justified, but short term intervention may be helpful.

Tagged under: ,

PrintThe idea that bacteria in the gut may have many twists in their skill set to enhance human health has been around for a while. That they may have the capability of inducing a cytoprotective enzyme called Nrf2 in local tissues, which in turn promotes the production of glutathione, detoxification and numerous other health supportive elements has until recently been less well understood.[1]

Nrf2 activation upregulates a regulon of genes including those involved in xenobiotic and reactive oxygen species (ROS) detoxification, as well as pro-restitutive function. This pathway has attracted considerable attention because small molecule inducers of Nrf2 have cytoprotective effects against oxidant and electrophilic environmental stressors.[2],[3]

BJNThe British Journal of Nutrition published a review paper in July 2015, exploring the relationship between inflammation, diet and health. Whilst this is neither new nor novel, the momentum is becoming clear. There is a steady awareness in research that the consumption of certain foods and the absence of others contributes to a provocative change in defence molecules with the result that many of the non-communicable diseases that blight western health care can develop and thrive.

This open access article is well worth saving for those refresh reads.[1]

The importance of chronic low-grade inflammation in the pathology of numerous age-related chronic conditions is now clear. An unresolved inflammatory response is likely to be involved from the early stages of disease development.

Tagged under: , ,

F1.mediumIn conjunction with the release of the JBS3 calculator the journal Heart published an open access paper looking as some of the established approaches to reducing cardiovascular risk.[1]

Whilst there are a great number of conventional strategies summarised in this review, it does not explore some of the more integrative approaches that are being increasingly developed to try to meet and manage the problems with CVD – however, it does provide a comprehensive range of lifestyle and medical interventions.

On that basis this is a useful base document that is related to the JBS3 calculator and current medical recommendations.

Tagged under: , , ,

JBS3One of the recent developments in risk assessment for cardiovascular disease has been the updated version of the JBS2 calculator to the JBS3.

This is an online or app based piece of software to help you determine your risk for future cardiovascular disease. Ideally it is used as a tool to moderate lifestyle and diet along with behaviour to guide an individual based on a modest range of markers on how they may reduce their risk to a minimum.