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UntitledLiquid gold. Golden milk. That brilliant saffron-hued spice. We hear a lot about turmeric these days—also known as Curcuma longa—a member of the ginger family, and native of Southeast Asia.[i]  Valued for its brilliant hue and distinctive spicy-bitter flavor, its use as a dye, a spice, and in religious ceremonies dates back nearly 4000 years.[ii],[iii] Turmeric is a mainstay in Ayurvedic and Chinese medicine, thanks in large part to curcuminoids—three bright golden-colored, lipophilic polyphenols (curcumin, demethoxycurcumin and bisdemethoxycurcumin), collectively known as “curcumin” that are derived from the plant’s rhizomes.[iv],[v]  The main component of the root is a volatile oil containing turmerone.

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A Novel Galactofucan Sulfate Extract Enhances Immunity, Inactivates Viruses Naturally and Reduces Inflammation. Interest in fucoidans surged when scientists began to study the world’s longest living people on the island of Okinawa… the Okinawan diet, which includes more than a dozen varieties of seaweed, is now considered one of the healthiest diets in the world.

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UntitledAn Interview with Polymer Chemist Helen Fitton on Fucoidan

Biography: Helen Fitton, BSc, MSc, PhD, is an applied chemist and the chief scientist for Marinova Pty Ltd, a biotechnology company headquartered in Tasmania, Australia, and dedicated to the development and manufacture of active biological extracts from marine macroalgae. Dr. Fitton is adjunct senior researcher at the University of Tasmania. She has contributed to 35 published research papers and 3 book chapters. She has also coauthored several peer review articles summarizing the scientific literature on fucoidans.

Focus: Your background is in polymer chemistry. Tell us a little about that, and how you came to specialize in fucoidans.

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Focus Summer - Fall 2017If you’ve ever tried to breathe through a straw or felt as if an invisible gorilla had your chest in a vice, or simply had to focus all your will and attention on drawing each breath—if you’ve ever had a bad asthma attack, you know how frightening asthma can be.

One in every 13 Americans suffers from this chronic lung disease characterized by ongoing airway inflammation, episodes of bronchoconstriction, and trouble breathing.[1] An estimated 39.5 million people (12.9%), including 10.5 million (14.0%) children in the United States have been diagnosed with asthma in their lifetimes.[2] Asthma is the top reason for missed school days in children.[3] In 2008, the group of children aged 5–17 years who each had one or more asthma attacks in the previous 12 months missed, in total, 10.5 million days of school. Adults who were employed and who each had one or more asthma attacks during the previous 12 months missed, in total, 14.2 million days of work due to asthma.[4] Researchers estimate the annual cost of asthma in the United States is around $56 billion.[5]

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Focus Summer - Fall 2017BIOGRAPHY   Laurie Hammer, NTP, received her degree in nutrition from the Nutritional Therapy Association in Tumwater, Washington, which is approved by the National Association of Nutrition Professionals (NANP).  She practices at Walker Chiropractic & Wellness in Algona, Iowa.

My practice largely centres around women aged  35–60, and for about 80% of them, I recommend an botanicalformula that contains lingzi (Ganoderma lucidum, commonly known as reishi), gancao (Glycyrrhiza uralensis, commonly known as Chinese licorice), ku shen (Sophora flavescens, commonly known as shrubby sophora), and Morinda citrifolia (commonly known as noni fruit).  I have found that this formula helps relieve adrenal “fatigue” (better understood as a dysfunctional hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis) and naturally optimizes cortisol. I have also found it to enhance my clients’ mood.

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By: Michael Ash, DO, ND, BSc, RNT, and Garth Nicolson, PhD, MD(H) Healthy membranes are key to the function of both cells and their intracellular organelles, such as mitochondria. Healthy cellular membranes can fully maintain their chemical and electrical barrier functions, and also act as cellular signals to promote positive changes in cellular functions and

The use of multi vitamins and minerals in stratified population supported as beneficial by the American Heart Journal publication reviewing the TACT trial.[1] The authors state: High-dose oral multivitamin and multimineral supplementation seem to decrease combined cardiac events in a stable, post-MI population not taking statin therapy at baseline. These unexpected findings are being retested

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224231As functional disorders of the gut continue to increase in occurrence and develop in frequency across all population groups, a broad based review in the Journal Digestive Disorders published in Feb 2018 is a welcome chance to tease out elements of discord and dysbiosis that present opportunities for personalised intervention.[1]

Background and Summary: Traditionally, functional gastro­intestinal disorders (FGID), including functional dyspepsia or irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), are defined by more or less specific symptoms and the absence of structural or bio­chemical abnormalities that cause these symptoms. This concept is now considered to be outdated; if appropriate tests are applied, structural or biochemical abnormalities that explain or cause the symptoms may be found in many patients. Another feature of FGID are the highly prevalent psychiatric comorbidities, such as depression and anxiety.

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The Big Vitamin D Mistake

Tuesday, 30 January 2018 by

jpmph-50-6-coverThe prohormone/nutrient vitamin D is well recognised to play numerous roles in the generation and management of human health, and for over a decade papers in their thousands have been published exploring its usefulness. But have they determined an oral dose that is lower than we need? A paper out in the Journal of Preventative Medicine and Public Health suggest we have – that an oral adult dose of 10,000iu is a daily requirement and that blood levels ≥100 nmol/L should be aimed for.[1]

The Abstract says: Since 2006, type 1 diabetes in Finland has plateaued and then decreased after the authorities’ decision to fortify dietary milk products with cholecalciferol. The role of vitamin D in innate and adaptive immunity is critical. A statistical error in the estimation of the recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for vitamin D was recently discovered; in a correct analysis of the data used by the Institute of Medicine, it was found that 8895 IU/d was needed for 97.5% of individuals to achieve values ≥50 nmol/L.

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There are two types of nutrient deficiencies, frank deficiencies (such as scurvy from ascorbic acid deficiency or goitre from iodine deficiency) and subclinical deficiencies (a clinically silent reduction in physiological, cellular and/or biochemical functions). It is the latter that is most concerning as it is hard to diagnose and predisposes to numerous chronic diseases.

Because serum magnesium does not reflect intracellular magnesium, the latter making up more than 99% of total body magnesium, most cases of magnesium deficiency are undiagnosed. Furthermore, because of chronic diseases, medications, decreases in food crop magnesium contents, and the availability of refined and processed foods, most people in modern societies are at risk for magnesium deficiency.

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